White House

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the president of the United States. It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D. C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban in the neoclassical style.

About White House in brief

Summary White HouseThe White House is the official residence and workplace of the president of the United States. It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D. C. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800. The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban in the neoclassical style. The modern-day White House complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, and Blair House, a guest residence. The property is a National Heritage Site owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President’s Park. In 2007, the White House was ranked second on the American Institute of Architects list of \”America’s Favorite Architecture\”. It was completed in 1792, but Washington never used it because it was not completed until after the national capital was moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in December 1790. It was nearly completed by the time of Adam’s 1797 inauguration, but he declined to occupy it saying he did not have Congressional authorization to lease it. It remained vacant until it was sold to the University of Pennsylvania in 1800, when it was converted into the Union Hotel for the president’s stay. The President’s House was later demolished in 1832 and replaced by a much grander presidential mansion several blocks away in Philadelphia. The White House has been used as a metonym by the president and their advisers for the past 100 years. The term ‘White House’ is often used to refer to the president or their advisers.

The mansion is made up of six stories—the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement. It was built between 1792 and 1800 using Aquia Creek sandstone painted white. When Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801, he added low colonnades on each wing that concealed stables and storage. In 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior. In the main mansion, the third-floor attic was converted to living quarters in 1927 by augmenting the existing hip roof with long shed dormers. A newly constructed East Wing was used for social events; Jefferson’s colonnade connected the new wings. In 1946, the residence’s load-bearing exterior walls and internal wood beams were found to be close to failure. Under Harry S. Truman, the interior rooms were completely dismantled and a new internal load- bearing steel frame constructed inside the walls. On November 1, 1800, President John Adams became the first president to occupy the White house in Washington. The executive mansion moved to the larger quarters of the Alexander Macomb House at 39–41 Broadway where he stayed, with his wife and a small staff until August 1790, and then to the Union House in New York City in February 1791. The president lived at the Franklin House and owned by Treasury Commissioner Samuel Osgood.