Satellite Science Fiction

Satellite Science Fiction was an American science-fiction magazine published from October 1956 to April 1959. It ran a full-length novel in each issue with a handful of short stories accompanying it. The first two issues featured Algis Budrys’s novel Man From Earth and Philip K. Dick’s debut novel, The Cosmic Puppets. The final issue was published in April 1961, but it was never printed in book form.

About Satellite Science Fiction in brief

Summary Satellite Science FictionSatellite Science Fiction was an American science-fiction magazine published from October 1956 to April 1959. It ran a full-length novel in each issue with a handful of short stories accompanying it. The policy was intended to help it compete against paperbacks, which were taking a growing share of the market. In an attempt to make Satellite more visible on the newsstands, Margulies changed the format from digest-size to letter-size with the February 1959 issue. This proved to be a mistake, and the sales figures for the first issue in the new format were weak; when Margulie saw the numbers he immediately closed down the magazine. The June 1959 issue was assembled but never printed, though a few galley proofs made their way into the hands of collectors. The first two issues featured Algis Budrys’s novel Man From Earth and Philip K. Dick’s debut novel, The Cosmic Puppets. Both were revised and appeared as paperbacks in the next two years, titled Man of Earth and Cosmic Puppet. The high standard of these two issues of Satellite could not be maintained, and in the opinion of sf historians and Mike Ashley, the magazine’s quality declined thereafter.

It was too late for the magazine to be of much use to anyone but collectors and fans of science fiction. The magazine’s distributor, PDC, was run by old friends of Marguly’s, and Satellite’s publisher, Renown Publications, later went out of business. The last issue of Satellite was printed in April 1959, and it was the last issue to be published by Renown. The final issue was published in April 1961, but it was never printed in book form, though some copies of the book have been published in hardback and hardback editions of the books were printed. The cover of the October 1961 issue was printed with the words: “Satellite: The Magazine That Is a Complete Novel in Every Issue!” The cover was later revised as part of his book Explorers of the Infinite, which also featured the cover image of Hal Clement’s “Planet Plunder”, which appeared in the third issue.