Red-tailed black cockatoo

The red-tailed black cockatoo is native to Australia. Adult males have a characteristic pair of bright red panels on the tail. Five subspecies are recognised, differing chiefly in beak size. The species is usually found in eucalyptus woodlands, or along water courses.

About Red-tailed black cockatoo in brief

Summary Red-tailed black cockatooThe red-tailed black cockatoo is native to Australia. Adult males have a characteristic pair of bright red panels on the tail that gives the species its name. Five subspecies are recognised, differing chiefly in beak size. The species is usually found in eucalyptus woodlands, or along water courses. They are seed eaters and cavity nesters, and as such depend on trees with fairly large diameters. Populations in southeastern Australia are threatened by deforestation and other habitat alterations. Of the black cockatoos, the red-tails is the most adaptable to aviculture. The closest relative is the black Bung-tailed Cockatoo of south-eastern Australia. The two species form the subgenus Calyptorhynchus within the same genus of the same name. A 1999 DNA study supported the hypotheses that the cockatos originated in Australia before the Paleogene and Neacatogene periods and that the genus Cacatua diversified in two radiations to two separate radiations in two separate islands. The bird is also the first bird from Eastern Australia illustrated by a European, as a female, presumably collected at Endeavour River in north Queensland, was sketched by Banks’ draughtsman Sydney Parkinson in 1770. In Central Australia, southwest of Alice Springs, the Pitjantjatjara term for the subspecies C.

b. samueli is iranti. In the language of the south-east South Australia and western Victoria, this bird was called treen. In South Australia, the two species of cockatoo form the two subspecies of the glossy blackcockatoo; the two are distinguished by their significant sexualorphism and calls of the juveniles; begging call, one squeaking a squeaking when swallowing food, and the other a naso, which means’meat’ or ‘animal’ The species complex was first described by the ornithologist John Latham in 1790 as Psittacus banksii, commemorating English botanist Sir Joseph Banks. For many years, the species was referred to as Calypticus magnificus, proposed by Gregory Mathews in 1927 as Shaw’s name had predated Latham’s 1790 description. In 1994, an application to conserve Calyticus banksii as the scientific name was accepted by the ICZN. It was unclear whether the original Port Jackson reference had actually referred to the redtailed black or, more likely, the glossyBlack cockatoos. The red- tails are the type species of the genus Calypticus, the name of which is derived from the Greek calypto-καλυπτο- “hidden” and rhynchous “beak” The red tails are more common in the drier parts of the continent, while the black tails are found in the more northerly parts.