Goodenough Island

Goodenough Island is the westernmost of the three large islands of the D’Entrecasteaux Islands. It is roughly circular in shape, measuring 39 by 26 kilometres with an area of 687 square kilometres and a shoreline of 116 kilometres. The island rises sharply to the summit of Mount Vineuo, 2,536 metres above sea level.

About Goodenough Island in brief

Summary Goodenough IslandGoodenough Island is the westernmost of the three large islands of the D’Entrecasteaux Islands in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea. It is roughly circular in shape, measuring 39 by 26 kilometres with an area of 687 square kilometres and a shoreline of 116 kilometres. The island rises sharply to the summit of Mount Vineuo, 2,536 metres above sea level, making it one of the most precipitous islands in the world. Like much of New Guinea, the climate is tropical with high temperatures and humidity throughout the year. The northwest monsoon season lasts from December to March and brings sudden rain squalls. Tropical cyclones are infrequent. Rainfall varies between 1,520 mm and 2,540 mm per annum.

Serious droughts occur once or twice a decade. Rushing streams with waterfalls drain water from the central mountain. A rare edible citrus plant, Citrus wakonai, grows on Goodenough Island. The first sighting of the archipelago by a European was by the French mariner Joseph Antoine Bruni d’Entréeaux in 1792. It remained unexplored by Europeans until 1874 when Captain John Moresby, commanding HMS Basilisk, landed on the western most island and gave it a European name after a British naval colleague, Commodore James Graham Goodenough. On 22 October 1942 the Australian warships HMAS Stuart and HMAS Arunta disembarked 640 soldiers.