Yugoslav destroyer Beograd

Beograd was the lead ship of her class of destroyers, built for the Royal Yugoslav Navy during the late 1930s. She entered service in April 1939, was armed with a main battery of four 120 mm guns in single mounts, and had a top speed of 35 knots. When Yugoslavia entered World War II due to the German-led Axis invasion of that country in April 1941, she was damaged by a near miss during an air attack, and was then captured by the Italians. After refitting, she saw extensive service with the Royal Italian Navy from August 1941 to September 1943, completing over 100 convoy escort missions in the Mediterranean under the name Sebenico. Following the Italian armistice in September 1943 she was capture by

About Yugoslav destroyer Beograd in brief

Summary Yugoslav destroyer BeogradBeograd was the lead ship of her class of destroyers, built for the Royal Yugoslav Navy during the late 1930s. She entered service in April 1939, was armed with a main battery of four 120 mm guns in single mounts, and had a top speed of 35 knots. When Yugoslavia entered World War II due to the German-led Axis invasion of that country in April 1941, she was damaged by a near miss during an air attack, and was then captured by the Italians. After refitting, she saw extensive service with the Royal Italian Navy from August 1941 to September 1943, completing over 100 convoy escort missions in the Mediterranean under the name Sebenico. Following the Italian armistice in September 1943 she was capture by the German Navy and redesignated TA43.

She served with the 9th Torpedo Boat Flotilla on escort and minelaying duties in the northern Adriatic. TA43 was sunk or scuttled at Trieste on 30 April or 1 May 1945. She was raised in June 1946, probably to remove her as a navigation hazard, and scuttling again in either July 1946 or in 1947. Beograd, her sister ships and four torpedo boats were dispatched to the port of Šiben, in the Dalmatian enclave of Zara, to prevent a bridge being established at Zara. To prevent this, a large part of Yugoslavia’s gold, 7,344 ingots, was lodged with the Bank of England for safekeeping. Less than a month after being commissioned, after being sent to the United Kingdom with a large portion of Yugoslavia’s gold.