White-naped xenopsaris

The white-naped xenopsaris is a species of suboscine bird in the family Tityridae. It is found in South America, in humid subtropical and tropical savanna climates in most of the countries east of the Andes. The bird is 12. 5 to 13 cm in length, with whitish undersides, a black crown, and grey-brown upperparts.

About White-naped xenopsaris in brief

Summary White-naped xenopsarisThe white-naped xenopsaris is a species of suboscine bird in the family Tityridae. It is found in South America, in humid subtropical and tropical savanna climates in most of the countries east of the Andes. The bird is 12. 5 to 13 cm in length, with whitish undersides, a black crown, and grey-brown upperparts. It feeds on insects in the foliage of trees and bushes, and sometimes on the ground. Nesting occurs in a simple cup nest placed in the fork of a tree. Both parents incubate the eggs and help feed the chicks. The species is not common and little is known about it, but it is not considered in danger of extinction, and has been classified as of least concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. There are two subspecies: the nominate subspecies and the more restricted Xminora. The nominate sub-species has the same plumage as the nominate, but the nominate Xmina is smaller than the reed becard and closely related to becards and tityras, measuring 12 to 13  cm in length and weighing around 10g.

The subspecies X Minora was described by Carl Hellmayr in 1920 and is the only member of the genus Xenopsaris. The specific name albinucha is from Latin and refers to the bird’s white nape. It was previously thought to be either a tyrant-flycatcher or cotinga, before it was placed in Tity Ridae. The genus name is derived from the Ancient Greek word xeno, meaning’stranger’ or’strange’, and Psaris, a synonym for Tiyra, based on the ancient Greek word for starling, by Georges Cuvier in 1817. It has two sub species: the white- naped becard, and the nominate white-napes becard. It can be found in Venezuela, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina. The sexes are similar in appearance, though the females have duller upperparts and the males have a duller crown.