The Bread-Winners

The Bread-Winners: A Social Study is an 1883 novel by John Hay, former secretary to Abraham Lincoln. Hay wrote his only novel as a reaction to several strikes that affected him and his business interests in the 1870s and early 1880s. The book takes an anti-organized labor stance, and when published anonymously sold well and provoked considerable public interest in determining who the author was.

About The Bread-Winners in brief

Summary The Bread-WinnersThe Bread-Winners: A Social Study is an 1883 novel by John Hay, former secretary to Abraham Lincoln. Hay wrote his only novel as a reaction to several strikes that affected him and his business interests in the 1870s and early 1880s. The book takes an anti-organized labor stance, and when published anonymously sold well and provoked considerable public interest in determining who the author was. The plot of the book revolves around former army captain Arthur Farnham, a wealthy resident of Buffland. He organizes Civil War veterans to keep the peace when the Bread-winners, a group of lazy and malcontented workers, call a violent general strike. He is sought in marriage by the ambitious Maud Matchin, daughter of a carpenter, but instead weds a woman of his own class. Neither meets success, though Offitt dexterously prevents her from actually saying no, and she is wooed by a spiritualist and a Bread-winner, and also by Offitt, who also is also a breadwinner. By the end of the strike, the mood has turned ugly among the city’s laborers, which has turned the mood among the mayor into an ugly mood, and the city is on the brink of civil war. The author never acknowledged the book as his, and it did not appear with his name on it until after his death in 1905. Hay’s hostile view of organized labor was soon seen as outdated and the book is best remembered for its onetime popularity and controversial nature.

The novel was originally published in installments in The Century Magazine, the book attracted wide interest, and some guessed right, but he never acknowledged his identity in the novel, and he did not acknowledge the book until after he died in 1905, when his name appeared on the cover of the magazine. It was published anonymously and sold well, but some guessed the book was written by Hay, who in 1898 became U.S. Secretary of State. It has been published in hardback, paperback, and e-book, and is available in hardcover and hardback for about $25.00 ($40.00 with free shipping). The book is published by Simon & Schuster, a division of Random House, which also publishes The New York Review of Books, and has been translated into Spanish, German, French, Italian, and Spanish. The first edition of the novel was published in 1883 and was published by Random House for $35.99 ($50.00). The second edition was published on June 14, 1883. It is now available for $50.99 (with free shipping) and $100.00 (with shipping) in the United States and $150.00 in the UK (including p&p). It is also available in the U.K. and Canada. The third edition is published in France and Germany, and can be ordered by clicking here for $30.00. The fourth edition has been released in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Germany.