Science Fiction Quarterly

Science Fiction Quarterly was an American pulp science fiction magazine that was published from 1940 to 1943 and again from 1951 to 1958. It was launched by publisher Louis Silberkleit during a boom in science fiction magazines at the end of the 1930s. The magazine’s policy was to reprint a novel in each issue as the lead story, though in practice the lead stories were often well short of novel length.

About Science Fiction Quarterly in brief

Summary Science Fiction QuarterlyScience Fiction Quarterly was an American pulp science fiction magazine that was published from 1940 to 1943 and again from 1951 to 1958. Charles Hornig served as editor for the first two issues; Robert A. W. Lowndes edited the remainder. It was launched by publisher Louis Silberkleit during a boom in science fiction magazines at the end of the 1930s. By the time Science Fiction Quarterly ceased publication in 1958, it was the last surviving science fiction pulp magazine, all other survivors having changed to different formats. The magazine’s policy was to reprint a novel in each issue as the lead story, though in practice the lead stories were often well short of novel length. Among the better-known stories published by the magazine were “Second Dawn”, by Arthur C. Clarke; “The Last Question”, by Isaac Asimov; and “Common Time”, by James Blish. The first issue of Future Fiction appeared in November 1939; it was followed in July 1940 by Science fiction Quarterly. The last issue of Science Fiction quarterly was the Spring 1941 issue of the magazine’s successor, Future Fiction. All three publications ceased publication before theend of World War II, falling prey to slow sales and paper shortages.

In 1950 and 1951, as the market improved, SilberKleit relaunched Future Fiction and Science Fiction Quarterly. The final issue of both titles appeared in April 1951. The cover of the Spring 1951 issue was a picture of the Starship Enterprise, with the caption: “This is the last of the S-F stories you’ll ever see from Arthur Clarke, the greatest living sci-fi writer”. The cover for the Spring 1953 issue was an image of the Enterprise with the words: “I’m sorry, I can’t tell you what to say, but I just can’t believe you’re still reading this.” The cover was a photo of the Millennium Falcon, which appeared in the March 1953 issue of The New Yorker. The front page of the March 1954 issue was the cover of The San Francisco Review with the headline: “It’s the Last Question, the Greatest Science Fiction Story of All Time” The cover story was a photograph of the Falcon with the title: “The Final Question, The Last Question”. The last page of that issue was titled “The Second Dawn, the First Dawn, The Final Question”, with the cover story: “Second Dawn, and the Final Dawn”.