Startling Stories

Startling Stories was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published from 1939 to 1955. It ran a lead novel in every issue; the first was The Black Flame by Stanley G. Weinbaum. By 1955 the pulp magazine market was collapsing, and Startling ceased publication. Ron Hanna of Wild Cat Books revived Startling Stories in 2007, but the company folded in 2013.

About Startling Stories in brief

Summary Startling StoriesStartling Stories was an American pulp science fiction magazine, published from 1939 to 1955. It was initially edited by Mort Weisinger, who was also the editor of Thrilling Wonder Stories, Standard’s other science fiction title. Startling ran a lead novel in every issue; the first was The Black Flame by Stanley G. Weinbaum. By 1955 the pulp magazine market was collapsing, and Startling ceased publication. Ron Hanna of Wild Cat Books revived Startling Stories in 2007, but the company folded in 2013. A statement of the closure is still posted on the Facebook page All Pulp dated 12 March 2013. The first issue of Startling was dated January 1939, with a first issue dated January 1940. The first cover art was painted by Earle K. Bergey, who became strongly associated with the magazine, painting almost every cover between 1940 and 1952. The cover art of the Winter 1945 issue was of Arthur C. Clarke’s Against the Fall of Night, and several other well-received stories. In 1954, Fred Wertham published Innocent Seduction of the Innocent, a book in which he asserted that children were better readers than adults. The last issue of Innocent came a few years later, but only a few months after the end of Standard Magazines’ pulp magazines, when all of the longest established and respected publishers, shut down their pulp magazines in the summer of 1949. The pulp magazines were dying, partially as a result of the success of the paperbacks, which were inciting children to read science fiction and fantasy novels.

The pulps were dying as well, and the pulp magazines began to fade away. The end of the pulpazines was the beginning of the demise of the pulps, and they were replaced by the internet. The demise of pulp magazines was a major event in the history of the science fiction industry. The death of pulp magazine publishing was the start of the decline of science fiction as a popular genre. The rise of the internet also played a part in the demise. The internet played a major role in the death of pulps as well as science fiction, and many pulp magazines no longer published science fiction or fantasy stories in the 1950s and 1960s. The decline of pulp fiction in the 1960s and 1970s led to a decline in pulp magazines and the decline in the pulp industry as a whole. It also led to the demise of many established pulp magazines such as The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, which ceased publication in the mid-1970s and was replaced by a new breed of magazines, such as Galaxy Science Fiction and Fantastic Story Magazine, which continued to be published until the late 1980s. In the 1970s and 1980s, the last pulp magazine to publish science fiction stories was The Amazing Stories, published by Hugo Gernsback. The final issue of the Amazing Stories magazine was published on December 31, 1978. The magazine was the last to publish a science fiction story before it was shut down. The next issue was the Winter 1949 issue.