Knowle West

Most of the area is coterminous with the Filwood ward of Bristol City Council. A small part of the estate lies within Knowle ward to the east. Famous former residents include the musician Tricky, the England rugby player Ellis Genge, the boxer Dixie Brown and late 1950s rock and roll band the Eagles.

About Knowle West in brief

Summary Knowle WestMost of the area is coterminous with the Filwood ward of Bristol City Council, although a small part of the estate lies within Knowle ward to the east. There is evidence of late Iron Age and Roman settlements in the area. Knowle West remained rural in character until the 1930s, when a council housing estate was developed to provide homes for people displaced by slum clearance in the centre of the city. Famous former residents include the musician Tricky, the England rugby player Ellis Genge, the boxer Dixie Brown and late 1950s rock and roll band the Eagles. The population as of 2008 was estimated as 11,787. Just under a third of the residents are classed as economically inactive. The area is one of the most economically deprived in Bristol. It has relatively high indices of crime and drug use, but community efforts to combat this have had some success. In the 1920s, the area was still rural in nature, mostly agricultural and allotment land, including Filwood Farm, Inns Court Farm and Hengrove House. An isolation hospital was built at Nover’s Hill in 1892, eventually superseded by a new hospital at Ham Green, near Pill, which opened in 1927. The site is now occupied by the Knowle DGE Special School. In Anglo-Saxon times Filwood Chase was part of a royal hunting estate known as Kingswood Forest, which encompassed a large area around Bristol. The building is in the process of repair and is on the “at risk” register.

In the 1960s, new homes were built on the Radburn principles, which had been erected since World War II at Filwood Park were demolished in the 1950s. The aim of the development was to provide new homes for those who needed to be relocated as a result of clearance of inner city slums in Bristol in Bristol, to provide healthier living conditions for large families on low incomes. A new wave of homes were grouped around cul-de-sacs arranged around a pre-fabricated cul- de-sac. The old field boundaries influenced the subsequent development of the new homes, with gardens of large and daylight and daylight. There are five schools and four churches in KnowleWest, as well as a number of open spaces, community centres, youth clubs and shopping facilities. In 1086, Knowle was assessed by the Domesday survey as part of Knowle in the hundred of Hartcliffe. The survey shows Knowle as having eleven households, three ploughlands, one cob, eight cattle, twenty five pigs, a meadow of 16 acres, pasture of 20 acres and a woodland area of 2. 5 furlongs by 1.5 furlong. For taxation purposes, the whole was assessed at two geld units. The closure of the Imperial Tobacco factory at nearby Hartcliffe in 1990 caused a large number of job losses. Knowle is now home to many small local enterprises and larger businesses on nearby trading estates.