Edward III of England

Edward III was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death. His fifty-year reign was the second-longest in medieval English history. Edward was crowned at age 14 after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup d’état against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country. After a successful campaign in Scotland he declared himself rightful heir to the French throne in 1337.

About Edward III of England in brief

Summary Edward III of EnglandEdward III was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death. He is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority. His fifty-year reign was the second-longest in medieval English history. He outlived his eldest son, Edward the Black Prince, and the throne passed to his grandson, Richard II. Edward was crowned at age 14 after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup d’état against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign. After a successful campaign in Scotland he declared himself rightful heir to the French throne in 1337. This started what became known as the Hundred Years’ War. Edward’s later years were marked by international failure and domestic strife, largely as a result of his inactivity and poor health. He was denounced as an irresponsible adventurer by later Whig historians such as Bishop William Stubbs, but modern historians credit him with some significant achievements. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. He also saw vital developments in legislation and government, in particular the evolution of the English Parliament, as well as the ravages of the Black Death. The reign of his father, Edward II, was a particularly problematic period of English history, with many sources of contention.

The birth of a male heir in 1312 temporarily improved Edward ii’s position in relation to the baronial opposition. To bolster further the independent prestige of the young prince, the king had him created Earl of Chester at only twelve days of age. In 1325, Edward II was faced with a demand from his brother-in-law, Charles IV, to perform homage for the English Duchy of Aquitaine. Instead, he had his son Edward created Duke of Aqu itaine in his place and sent him to France to perform the homage. The young Edward was accompanied by Isabella, who was the sister of King Charles, and was meant to negotiate a peace treaty with the French. While in France, isabella conspired with the exiledRoger Mortimer to have Edward deposed. It was not long before the new reign also met with other problems caused by the central position at court of Mortimer,. Mortimer used his power to acquire noble estates and titles, and his power grew with defeat by the Scots at the Battle of Stanhope Park and Edinburgh–North the Scots in 1328. Also the young king was in conflict with his guardian, William Montagu, 3rd Baron Montagu and a small number of other trusted men. Eventually the king decided to take direct action against him and had him executed by surprise at Nottingham Castle on 19 October 1330 on 15 June 1330. Edward had a son Edward Woodstock, who married at York Minster on 24 January 1328, and had a daughter Edward of Woodstock on June 15, 1530.