Chetro Ketl

Chetro Ketl is an Ancestral Puebloan great house and archeological site located in Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico. Construction on Chetro Ketl began c. 990 and was largely complete by 1075, with significant remodeling occurring in the early and mid-1110s. CheTro Ketl contained approximately 400 rooms and was the largest great house by area in Chacos Canyon, covering nearly 3 acres.

About Chetro Ketl in brief

Summary Chetro KetlChetro Ketl is an Ancestral Puebloan great house and archeological site located in Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico, United States. Construction on Chetro Ketl began c. 990 and was largely complete by 1075, with significant remodeling occurring in the early and mid-1110s. The great house is a D-shaped structure; its east wall is 280 feet long, and the north wall is more than 450 feet ; the perimeter is 1,540 feet, and the diameter of the great kiva is 62. 5 feet. CheTro Ketl contained approximately 400 rooms and was the largest great house by area in Chacos Canyon, covering nearly 3 acres. Chetro ketl’s purpose is widely debated but many archeologists believe the building was a place of large-scale ceremony that held an important position within the larger Chacoan system. The building has deteriorated significantly since its rediscovery in theEarly 19th century, and its usefulness as a source of information about ChacoAn culture is slowly diminishing. It required more than 500,000 man-hours, 26,000 trees, and 50 million sandstone blocks to erect Chetroketl. It may have been occupied primarily by groups of priests and, during times of ritual, pilgrims from outlying communities. The area may be an ancestral sacred zone. Projectile points found in the vicinity of Chaco Canyon suggest that hunters may have Been active in the region as early as 10,000. By 6,000 the Picosa culture had developed from within the Paleolithic population, as environmental changes caused the eastward movement of animals and people to the Southern Plains, bringing Southwestern and northern Mexican cultures into the San Juan Basin.

By 200 BCE, the Basketmaker II people had begun to develop from the Oshara Tradition. During the 4th century CE, the first four people established pit-houses at elevated locations near sources of water and arable land near the canyon. This period also marked the introduction of the bow and arrow to the region, and must have brought a revolution in cooking. During this period, as rainfall allowed for sustained agriculture, more and more people became reliable sources of pottery and pottery-making supplies. During the 5th to 8th centuries CE, people became more reliable and established permanent settlements in the area. Population increases during the 6th century led to the settlement of the area’s lowlands, including the Chaco canyon and parts of San Juan Canyon, including Pueblo Bonito and Fagan, as well as the San Diego River. The first human presence in the canyon dates to a hunter-gatherer society that she named the Osh Mara Tradition, which developed within the local Archaic Picosa population. The Oshara occupied portions of northwestern New Mexico,. northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and central and southwestern Colorado. They harvested jackrabbits in the basin asEarly as 5500.