Cheadle Hulme

Cheadle Hulme is a suburb in the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. In 2011, it had a population of 26,479. It has a railway station and is close to Manchester Airport, the M60 and the A34.

About Cheadle Hulme in brief

Summary Cheadle HulmeCheadle Hulme is a suburb in the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. It lies in the Ladybrook Valley, on the Cheshire Plain, and the drift consists mostly of boulder clay, sands and gravels. Evidence of Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon activity, including coins, jewellery and axes, has been discovered locally. The area was first mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 when it was a large estate which included neighbouring Cheadle. In the early 14th century, it was split into southern and northern parts. Unlike many English villages, it did not grow around a church; instead it formed from several hamlets, many of which retain their names as neighbourhoods. In 2011, it had a population of 26,479. It has a railway station and is close to Manchester Airport, the M60 and the A34. It is 2.3 miles south-west of Stock Port and 7. 5 miles south-east of Manchester. It was acquired by the Moseley family in the 17th century and became known as C headle moseley. It became a distinct place in its own right in 1974 and is now part of theropolitan Borough ofStockport. The name may have been derived from the Danish word for ‘water meadow’ or ‘island in the fen’ It was once owned by a free Saxon, under Hugh d’Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester, and later became the property of the de Chedle family, who took their name from the land they owned.

A stone cross dedicated to the Anglo- Saxon St Chad, discovered in 1873, indicates Anglo- saxon activity. It may be of Roman origin. The modern-day C Headle Road was originally known as Street Lane, and may be of Roman origins. It  was described as ‘large and important’ and ‘a wood three leagues long and half as broad’ and valued at £20 in 1086. One of the earliest owners of the property was the Earl ofChester. The estates were reunified on the death of the last of the Vernons in 1476. The only heir to the estates were the daughter of Clemence and William de Bagule, who married the manor’s owner, Thomas Danyers. In 1626 the title passed to his brother, Thomas Savage, who continued to receive payments to receive the title of Discount of Lyme Hall until his death in 1626. The first son, John Savage, succeeded to the title and nine more followed him. The title was created I created the title Discanyers of Charles Viscany, which was created after his death. The last son, Thomasavage, died in 1636 and his daughter Margaret, who succeeded him, received the title Margaret Savage. The second son, William Savage, was the first to receive payment from the King of England as well as the gift of Lyme.