Central London Railway

The Central London Railway (CLR) was a deep-level, underground railway that opened in London in 1900. When opened, the CLR served 13 stations and ran completely underground in a pair of tunnels for 9. 14 kilometres. It was extended at the western end to Wood Lane in 1908 and at the eastern end to Liverpool Street station in 1912. In 1920, it was extended along a Great Western Railway line to Ealing to serve a total distance of 17. 57 kilometres. The line was taken over by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London in 1913 and taken into public ownership in 1933.

About Central London Railway in brief

Summary Central London RailwayThe Central London Railway (CLR) was a deep-level, underground railway that opened in London in 1900. When opened, the CLR served 13 stations and ran completely underground in a pair of tunnels for 9. 14 kilometres. It was extended at the western end to Wood Lane in 1908 and at the eastern end to Liverpool Street station in 1912. In 1920, it was extended along a Great Western Railway line to Ealing to serve a total distance of 17. 57 kilometres. The line was taken over by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London in 1913. In 1933 the CLR was taken into public ownership along with the UERL. The railway company was established in 1889, funding for construction was obtained in 1895 through a syndicate of financiers and work took place from 1896 to 1900. The route was inspired by the route of abandoned plans for the London Central Subway, a sub-surface railway that was briefly proposed in early 1890 to run directly below the roadway on a similar route to the CLR. The proposed Southampton Row station was replaced by one in Bloomsbury. The earlier plan to connect to the C&SLR was dropped and the earlier diameter of the CLR’s tunnels was increased to 6 inches. This bill was approved by both Houses of Parliament and received Royal Assent on August 5, 1891. In November 1891, the publicised bill was publicised as the Central London Railway Act,1891. The bill proposed an underground electric railway running from the junction of Queen’s Road and Bayswater Road in Bays water to King William Street in the City of London with a connection to the then-under construction, City and South London Railway at Arthur Street West.

The proposals faced strong objections from the Metropolitan and District Railways, whose routes on the Inner Circle, to the north and the south respectively, the new line was expected to take passengers. The Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s Cathedral objected, concerned about the risks of undermining the cathedral’s foundations, and Sir Joseph Bazalgette objected that the tunnels would damage the city’s sewer system. The eastern end of the line was re-routed north and extended to end at the Great Eastern Railway’s terminus at Liverpool Street. The western terminus was changed to end under Notting Hill High Street and Holland Park Avenue to end in Shepherd’s Bush Green, with the depot and power station site relocated to be north of the terminus on the east side of Wood Lane. The eastern terminus of the western line was changed to end at Cornhill Intermediate Road, with a new proposed station at Lansdowne Road, and at Lans Hill Gate, Notting Hill Gate and at Chancery Lane added at Lans Downe Lane. This was dropped at the end of 1891 and a new station was proposed at the Royal Cornhill station with the new terminus at Royal Cornhill and a proposed new station at Lansdowne Hill.