Baker Street and Waterloo Railway

The Baker Street and Waterloo Railway was a deep-level underground railway in London. The company struggled to fund the work, and construction did not begin until 1898. In 1900, work was hit by the financial collapse of its parent company, the London & Globe Finance Corporation. The line was opened in November 1890 and carried large numbers of passengers in its first year. It is now part of the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL)

About Baker Street and Waterloo Railway in brief

Summary Baker Street and Waterloo RailwayThe Baker Street and Waterloo Railway was a deep-level underground railway in London. The company struggled to fund the work, and construction did not begin until 1898. In 1900, work was hit by the financial collapse of its parent company, the London & Globe Finance Corporation. The BS&WR’s line served nine stations and ran completely underground in a pair of tunnels for 5. 81 kilometres. Today, the line’s tunnels and stations operate as the London Underground’s Bakerloo line. The idea of building an underground railway along the approximate route was put forward well before it came to fruition at the turn of the century. In November 1891, notice was given of a private bill that would be presented to Parliament for the construction of the BS& WR. The railway was planned to run entirely underground from the junction of New Street and Dorset Square west of Baker Street to James Street on the south side of Waterloo station. It was later extended to Queen’s Park, where it connected with the London and North Western Railway, and to Watford; a total distance of 33. 34 kilometres. Within the first year of opening it became apparent to the management and investors that the estimated passenger numbers for the BS &WR and the other UERL lines were over-optimistic. Despite improved integration and cooperation with the other tube railways and the later extensions, theBS&WR struggled financially. In 1933, the BS &WR was taken into public ownership along with the UerL. The bill was approved as the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway Act 1893 on 28 March 1893, and received royal assent on 28 April 1893.

The line was opened in November 1890 and carried large numbers of passengers in its first year. The City and South London Railway, the world’s first deep-tube railway, which proved the feasibility of such an endeavour, was also opened in 1890. A bill was also submitted to Parliament to ensure a consistent approach to the construction and operation of the railways. After rejecting the bill, a Joint Select Committee took evidence on various matters regarding the construction, operation and recommendations on the diameter of tube tunnels, method of traction and the way of traction, granting the construction. The decision made between 1892 and 1892 was consistent with the decision made by the Joint Select Committee to ensure that the proposals were consistent and consistent with normal parliamentary consideration. The route was approved and received normal consideration on March 28, 1893, with the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway Act of 1893 making the route available for normal consideration for the first time in the history of the UK. The  line was extended to Elephant and Castle with a depot on a short spur nearby at London Road. It then ran under Haymarket, Trafalgar Square and Northumberland Avenue before passing under the River Thames to Waterloo Station. It came to the surface and connected to the Great Western Railway at Paddington between 1915 and 1917. It is now part of the Underground Electric Railways Company of London (UERL)