Battle of San Patricio

The Battle of San Patricio was fought on February 27, 1836, during the Texas Revolution. The battle marked the start of the Goliad Campaign, the Mexican offensive to retake the Texas Gulf Coast. After a fifteen-minute battle, all but six Texians had been killed or imprisoned.

About Battle of San Patricio in brief

Summary Battle of San PatricioThe Battle of San Patricio was fought on February 27, 1836, during the Texas Revolution. The battle marked the start of the Goliad Campaign, the Mexican offensive to retake the Texas Gulf Coast. By the end of 1835, all Mexican troops had been driven from Texas. Texians declared themselves part of a state independent from Coahuila y Tejas and created a provisional state government based on the principles of the Constitution of 1824. The Mexican Army quickly put down revolts in the Mexican interior, including a brutal suppression of militias in Oaxaca and Zacatecas. In the early 19th century, captured pirates were executed immediately in the U.S. military for their role in the Spanish-American war of 1815-1820. The Battle of San Patricio took place in the early hours of February 27. After a fifteen-minute battle, all but six Texians had been killed or imprisoned. One Mexican soldier was killed and four injured. The Texian Matamoros Expedition was led by Frank W. Johnson, the commander of the volunteer army in Texas. Johnson and his aide James Grant took the bulk of the army and almost all of the supplies to Golisad to prepare for the expedition.

Most of these volunteers were Americans or Europeans who had arrived in Texas after the Revolution. In late December, at his behest, Congress passed the Tornel Decree, declaring that any foreigners fighting against Mexican troops “will be deemed pirates and dealt with as such, being citizens of no nation presently at war with the Republic and fighting under no recognized flag”. The resolution gave the Mexican Army permission to take no prisoners in the war against the Texians. The Texas provisional government had named Sam Houston as the new commander of Texas, but without authority over the volunteers. The provisional Governor of Texas reported to Johnson and ordered the volunteers to find a way to disband. By end of January 1836 only 70 men remained with Johnson and Grant with only 70 men remaining with Johnson. Most left the army, while others joined the army while others were stationed under Houston’s second-in-command, James Fannin.