1678 Kediri campaign

The 1678 Kediri campaign took place during the Trunajaya rebellion. The forces of the Mataram Sultanate, led by Amangkurat II, and the Dutch East India Company led by Anthonio Hurdt marched inland into eastern Java. The army marched through areas previously unexplored by the Dutch. The Dutch and Javanese victors plundered the city and Mataram’s treasury was completely lost.

About 1678 Kediri campaign in brief

Summary 1678 Kediri campaignThe 1678 Kediri campaign took place during the Trunajaya rebellion. The forces of the Mataram Sultanate, led by Amangkurat II, and the Dutch East India Company led by Anthonio Hurdt marched inland into eastern Java. The Mataram–VOC army crossed the Brantas River on the night of 16–17 November. They then marched on Tr unajaya’s capital and stronghold at Kediri and took it by direct assault on 25 November. The Dutch and Javanese victors plundered the city and Mataram’s treasury was completely lost in the looting. The army marched through areas previously unexplored by the Dutch. It was of a great importance to the VOC, because Batavia could not survive without food imports from central and eastern Java, and needed timber from the north coast to build and repair ships for its trading fleet, and for new construction in the city. In exchange for helping Mataram against his enemies, AmangKurat promised to pay the Voc 310,000 Spanish reals and about 5,000 tonnes of rice. In further agreements, he agreed to cede districts east of Batavia, as well as Semariga and its surrounding districts, and awarded the company a monopoly of opium imports into Mataram. In November and December, there were only limited operations by Mataram forces with the support of VOC forces on north coast, with only limited support from the Governor of north Java, General Joan Mauycker.

The VOC was eager to march quickly against the rebels, but this was delayed by the cautious policy of the Governor General of the north, General Joachim Maetser, who did not want to antagonize the rebels. In December 1679, the rebels were finally defeated and captured by VOC troops in the Battle of Bekasi, but they were not able to take the city until the end of 1679. The battle was recorded in a journal by HurdT’s secretary Johan Jurgen Briel. Accounts of the campaign also appear in the Jvanese chronicles, known as babads. The campaign was documented in the Dutch account was recorded by Johans Jurgens Briel, the secretary of the Dutch governor of north and east Java, Johannes van Rijn, and in the journal of Johan van Risbergen, the editor of the journal, which was published in 1678 and 1681. The Mataram Sultanate and VOC signed a treaty renewing their alliance in October 1677. The treaty covered payments for all previous VOC campaigns on Mataram’s behalf up to October 1678. It also included a monopoly on the import of textiles and sugar into the Sultanate as well on the purchase of sugar and opium into Mataram. The alliance was ratified in March 1677, and it was signed by Amangkurat II in October.