Yugoslav monitor Drava

The Yugoslav monitor Drava was a river monitor operated by the Royal Yugoslav Navy between 1921 and 1941. She was originally built for the Austro-Hungarian Navy as the name ship of the Enns-class river monitors. As SMS Enns, she was part of the Danube Flotilla during World War I, and fought against the Serbian and Romanian armies. After brief service with the Hungarian People’s Republic at the end of the war she was transferred to the newly created Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

About Yugoslav monitor Drava in brief

Summary Yugoslav monitor DravaThe Yugoslav monitor Drava was a river monitor operated by the Royal Yugoslav Navy between 1921 and 1941. She was originally built for the Austro-Hungarian Navy as the name ship of the Enns-class river monitors. As SMS Enns, she was part of the Danube Flotilla during World War I, and fought against the Serbian and Romanian armies from Belgrade to the lower Danube. After brief service with the Hungarian People’s Republic at the end of the war she was transferred to the newly created Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. She remained in service throughout the interwar period, but was not always in full commission due to budget restrictions. During the German-led Axis invasion of Yugoslavia in April 1941, she spent six days shelling airfields near Mohács in Hungary and fought off a small flotilla of Hungarian gunboats. Only 13 of the crew survived, and she was raised and scrapped by Hungary during their occupation of parts of Yugoslavia. The base of the Serbian River Flotillas at Novi Sad is named after her captain, Aleksandar Berić, who was posthumously awarded the Order of Karađorđe’s Star for his sacrifice. Her armour consisted of 25mm belt and bulkheads, 40mm thick, and her conning tower and gun turrets were 50mm thick. The original plans called for open anti-aircraft mounts, but the experience of the first battles in the first Danube battle demonstrated that small arms protection from small arms fire was needed.

She had two triple-expansion steam engines, each driving a single propeller shaft. Her engines were rated at 1,500 indicated horsepower, with a maximum of 1,700 ihp. She was designed to reach a top speed of 13 knots, and carried 70 tonnes of fuel oil. The range of her Škoda 120 mm L45 guns was 15km, and could fire their maximum range of 6km shells a 6 kilometres. The ship was also equipped with six 8mm machine guns, which were placed on the top of the ship’s conning towers to protect the crew from enemy fire. The crew consisted of 95 officers and enlisted men, and the standard displacement was 536 tonnes, and her crew consisted of 95Officers and enlistedmen. She was launched in September 1914, and completed on 17 October of that year. Despite the requirement that Enns and SMS Inn be constructed as sister ships, the fact that their size and armament were identical, there were significant design differences between the two vessels, as they were constructed by completely independent shipbuilding companies. The ship had an overall length of 60. 2 m, a beam of 10. 3 m and a normal draught of 1.3 m.