Typhoon Haiyan

Typhoon Haiyan, known in the Philippines as Super Typhoon Yolanda, was one of the most powerful tropical cyclones ever recorded. On making landfall, Haiyan devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines. At least 6,300 people were killed in that country alone. It remains the deadliest typhoon in the history of the Philippines, with many more bodies still being found in January 2014.

About Typhoon Haiyan in brief

Summary Typhoon HaiyanTyphoon Haiyan, known in the Philippines as Super Typhoon Yolanda, was one of the most powerful tropical cyclones ever recorded. On making landfall, Haiyan devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines. At least 6,300 people were killed in that country alone. Haiyan is tied with Meranti in 2016 for being the second strongest landfalling tropical cyclone on record. The storm caused catastrophic destruction in the Visayas, particularly on Samar and Leyte. According to UN officials, about 11 million people were affected and many were left homeless. It was the thirtieth named storm, thirteenth typhoon, and fifth super typhoon of the 2013 Pacific typhoon season. It is also the most intense tropicalcyclone in the Eastern Hemisphere by 1-minute sustained winds. The typhoon was last noted as a tropical depression by the JMA on the following day. It made five landfalls in the country before emerging over the South China Sea. It eventually struck northern Vietnam as a severe tropical storm on November 10. The eye of the typhoon made its first landfall at Guiuan, Eastern Samar at peak strength on November 7. It then weakened to a tropical storm before passing over the island of Kayangel in Palau on November 8. It finally dissipated over the southern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula on November 11. It has been named by some as the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record, killing at least 6,.300 people in that nation alone.

It remains the deadliest typhoon in the history of the Philippines, with many more bodies still being found in January 2014. It became a Category 5-equivalent super Typhoon on the Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale on November 6. It also became the most severe tropical cyclONE in the Pacific Ocean since Hurricane Patricia in 2015 on November 9. It later weakened to Category 4-equivalence on the Fujita Scale on November 12. It weakened again to Category 3-equ equivalent on November 13. It hit northern Vietnam on November 14 as a severe tropical storm, before dissipating on November 15. It left a trail of destruction in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific, including the Philippines and the Solomon Islands, as well as a number of islands in the Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia. It caused the deaths of more than 6,000 people in thePhilippines and more than 1,000 in the Solomon Islanders. It remained a Category 4 typhoon until November 15, when it weakened to category 5. It continued to weaken until November 16, when the storm was downgraded to a Category 3 storm by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) It is still a major typhoon to this day, with sustained winds of up to 315kmh and gusts up to 380kmh in some parts of the region. The JTWC estimated the system’s one-minute sustained winds at 315 kmh, unofficially making Haiyan the strongest tropical cyclone ever observed based on wind speed.