Russian battleship Slava

Slava was a pre-dreadnought battleship of the Imperial Russian Navy. Completed too late to participate in the Battle of Tsushima during the Russo-Japanese War, she survived while all of her sister ships were either sunk during the battle or surrendered to the Imperial Japanese Navy. Serving in the Baltic Sea during World War I, Slava was the largest ship of the Russian Gulf of Riga Squadron that fought the German High Seas Fleet in August 1915. She was badly damaged by the German dreadnought SMS König, significantly increasing her draft. The shallow channel made it impossible to escape and she was scuttled in the Moon Sound Strait between the island of Muhu and the mainland in 1917.

About Russian battleship Slava in brief

Summary Russian battleship SlavaSlava was a pre-dreadnought battleship of the Imperial Russian Navy, the last of the five Borodino-class battleships. Completed too late to participate in the Battle of Tsushima during the Russo-Japanese War, she survived while all of her sister ships were either sunk during the battle or surrendered to the Imperial Japanese Navy. Serving in the Baltic Sea during World War I, Slava was the largest ship of the Russian Gulf of Riga Squadron that fought the German High Seas Fleet in August 1915. She repeatedly bombarded German positions and troops for the rest of 1915 and during 1916. She was badly damaged by the German dreadnought SMS König, significantly increasing her draft. The shallow channel made it impossible to escape and she was scuttled in the Moon Sound Strait between the island of Muhu and the mainland in 1917. The Estonians scrapped her during the 1930s. She had a total displacement of 14,415 long tons, almost 900 long tons more than her designed displacement of 13,516 long tons. At full load she carried 1,350 long tons of coal that provided her a range of 2,590 nautical miles at a speed of 10 knots. Slava’s 40-caliber 12-inch guns were mounted in two twin-gun turrets, one each fore and aft. They had a rate of fire of about three rounds per minute and were provided with 180 rounds per gun. She carried four 15-inch torpedo tubes, one above water in the bow and one in the stern with two torpedoes each.

Two of these were removed before 1914, although it is not known which ones were retained. She reportedly fitted with two 47 mm anti-aircraft guns during the war, but carried only four 3-inch AA guns in early 1917. On one of her training cruises to the Mediterranean, her crewmen rescued survivors of the Messina earthquake and took care of serious boilermen during the 1908 Naples earthquake. The ship had a serious boiler problem in 1908 and had to be taken to Naples for medical treatment. She also had a problem with her boilers during the post-Tsushima naval reforms as part of a training program for new officers from the Naval College that was formed after the Rebellion. The boilers and boilers were both built by the Baltic Works. While she was laid up over the winter of 1916 at Helsinki, the elevation of her main guns was increased to a maximum of 25° which increased her range to 23,000 yards. Slava was laid down on 1 November 1903, launched on 29 August 1903, and completed in October 1905, too late for the battle with the Tsesaris. Her main guns were placed well above the waterline for use in any weather, unlike the remaining sixteen guns, which weremounted in casemates one deck lower and distributed over the length of the ship.