Northern rosella

The northern rosella is a species of parrot native to northern Australia. The species is unusually coloured with a dark head and neck with pale cheeks. It is predominantly herbivorous, consuming seeds, grasses and eucalypts. The sexes have similar plumage, while females and younger birds are generally duller.

About Northern rosella in brief

Summary Northern rosellaThe northern rosella is a species of parrot native to northern Australia. It was described by Heinrich Kuhl in 1820, and two subspecies are recognised. The species is unusually coloured with a dark head and neck with pale cheeks. It is predominantly herbivorous, consuming seeds, grasses and eucalypts. Although uncommon, it is rated as least concern on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Endangered species. The sexes have similar plumage, while females and younger birds are generally duller with occasional spots of red. The long tail is blue-green and the wings are black and blue-violet. The mantle and scapulars are black with fine yellow scallops, while its back, rump and underparts are pale yellow with fine black scallop. The nominate subspecies is white in the Northern Territory and blue in the Western Australian subspecies hillii. A study in 2017 found that the eastern rosellas split into the pale-headed and white-headed forms that gave rise to the northern rosellinga.

The northern rosellera is one of six species in the genus Platycercus, the other three are the eastern and pale-head roselles. It can be found in the Gulf of Carpentaria and Arnhem Land to the Kimberley, as well as on the NSW mid north coast and on the South Australian mainland. For confidential support call the Samaritans on 08457 90 90 90 or visit a local Samaritans branch, see www.samaritans.org for details. In the U.S. call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline on 1-800-273-8255 or visit www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org. In Europe and the UK, contact the National suicide Prevention Line on 0800 555 111 or click here for details on how to get in touch with Samaritans in the UK and the rest of the world. For information on the Royal Ornithologists’ Union, visit their website. For more information about the ROTU, visit the Ornithological Society of Australia’s website.