New York State Route 32

New York State Route 32 is a north–south state highway that extends for 176. 73 miles through the Hudson Valley and Capital District regions of the U.S. state of New York. It is a two-lane surface road for nearly its entire length, with few divided and no limited-access sections. The roads now making up the highway were originally part of several privately maintained turnpikes, which fostered settlements along the corridor. Once part of the former NY 58, it has been NY-32 since 1930.

About New York State Route 32 in brief

Summary New York State Route 32New York State Route 32 is a north–south state highway that extends for 176. 73 miles through the Hudson Valley and Capital District regions of the U.S. state of New York. It is a two-lane surface road for nearly its entire length, with few divided and no limited-access sections. NY 32 begins at NY 17 on the outskirts of the New York metropolitan area in Woodbury just outside Harriman, and ends at NY-196 east of Hudson Falls just south of the Adirondacks. In between, the road passes through the cities of Newburgh, Kingston, Albany, Cohoes, and Glens Falls. Outside of the cities, it offers views of the Hudson Highlands, Shawangunk Ridge, Catskill Mountains, and, during an overlap with US 4 north of Albany, the Hudson River. The roads now making up the highway were originally part of several privately maintained turnpikes, which fostered settlements along the corridor. Once part of the former NY 58, it has been NY-32 since 1930. Only one of three letter-suffixed spur routes remains. Maintenance of NY  32 is split between the State Department of Transportation and the highway departments of several different jurisdictions. In four other cities, the route is mostly locally maintained. One last locally maintained section exists in the Albany suburb of Bethlehem, where the highway is county-maintained between Feura Bush Road and the Delmar Bypass.

This section is co-signed as County Route 52, which continues northwest of NY 32 to a junction with NY 140 near Slingerlands. The road becomes the main commercial road as it enters the city of Newburgh, Newburgh’s main street, Broadway, unsigned. The brief concurrency with USKW ends at the former Broadway WKW at the junction where NY 84 and NY 52 cross the Newburgh Bridge. The two highways remain joined for the next 1.5 miles as they pass the Frederick Law Olmsted-designed Frederick Law Vaux-designed Calvert Park and Frederick Olmstead School. The next 2 miles include a middle turn lane as NY 32’s main commercial strip, with Snake Hill Avenue to the west of New Windsor’s Snake Hill to west of the city limit. At the end of the road, NY 34 turns east, heading towards the city limits of I-84–Beacon Bridge, where they cross the NY Beacon Bridge and the I-Beacon Highway. The highway then turns north again, beginning the first of several concurrences with US 9W. It ends at US 9W at Broadway KW, where it joins the former US WW–I-84 highway heading towards Newburgh. It then turns east again, heading toward the former Newburgh Beacons School, where NY 32, and I-Beacons Road end at the I–84 Bridge.