Joehana

Akhmad Bassah was an author from the Dutch East Indies who wrote in Sundanese. He was classified as a realist owing to his use of the names of actual locations and products in his works. He worked for a time on the railroad before becoming an author by 1923.

About Joehana in brief

Summary JoehanaAkhmad Bassah was an author from the Dutch East Indies who wrote in Sundanese. He worked for a time on the railroad before becoming an author by 1923. Joehana has been classified as a realist owing to his use of the names of actual locations and products in his works. He was also a productive translator, dramatist, and reporter, and operated a company which offered writing services. His works were popular in the Bandung area where they were sold. Two of his works have been republished since the 1960s, and stage productions of his novel Rasiah nu Goreng Patut continued into the 1980s. Sources disagree regarding the year of his death; some offer 1930, while others give 1942–45. His body is buried in Bandung, Java, where he was married to a schoolteacher named Atikah, and they had no biological children. He is best remembered by that pen name, taken from the name of his adoptive daughter; he is thought to have died in 1930, a year after helping put together a stage performance based on his novel Kalepatan Poetraana Iboe Ramaa Tasikmala in Tasakmala. He had a strong interest in social welfare; this interest influenced his novels and influenced his work. Though he was an active member of the Sarekat Rakyat, an organization with communist leanings, and helped that group in its mission of social service.

His novels were adapted to the stage and film, but they received little academic attention until the 1960’s, and critical consensus since then has been negative. In 1928, he opened the Romans Bureau, which was advertised as offering a variety of services, including the writing and printing of advertisements, translations, and the preparation of story concepts for other writers. He may have also opened a writing course, although apparently most of his income was derived from the royalties of his publications. At the time, Balai Pustaka, a publisher operated by the Dutch colonial government, was attracting numerousSundanese-language writers. His biographers Tini Kartini et al. suggest that he rejected his contemporaries’ approach, choosing to work independently rather than again work for the government which had fired him and would certainly censor his works, as he would have faced censors. However, Ajip Rosidi, a scholar of SundanESE literature, suggests that his refusal to use formal Sundaese meant that BalaiPustaka would not accept his works in the first place.