Interstate 496

I-496 is an auxiliary Interstate Highway that passes through downtown Lansing in the US state of Michigan. I-496 runs east–west from I-96I-69 near the downtown area and north–south along a section that runs concurrently with US Highway 127. The freeway also passes a former assembly plant used by Oldsmobile and runs along or crosses parts of the Grand and Red Cedar rivers. The highway is a part of the State Trunkline Highway System, which is a component of the National Highway System of the United States.

About Interstate 496 in brief

Summary Interstate 496I-496 is an auxiliary Interstate Highway that passes through downtown Lansing in the US state of Michigan. I-496 runs east–west from I-96I-69 near the downtown area and north–south along a section that runs concurrently with US Highway 127. The freeway also passes a former assembly plant used by Oldsmobile and runs along or crosses parts of the Grand and Red Cedar rivers. It has been named the R. E. Olds Freeway for Ransom E. Olds, the founder of Oldsmobiles and the REO Motor Car Company. Construction of I-496 started in 1963, and the freeway opened on December 18, 1970. In 2011, the average traffic count along the trunkline highway was 61,600 vehicles. As of 2011, all of the highways listed on the National Interstate Highway System were deemed an Interstate Highway, which was the lowest count of all the trunklines along the Michigan trunkline system. The highest traffic count was along US 127, which had 17,600vehicles on that day. The trunkline is maintained by the Michigan Department of Transportation, which has a contract with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to maintain the highways.

The highway is a part of the State Trunkline Highway System, which is a component of the National Highway System of the United States. It is the only trunkline Highway to be named after a former mayor or a former state governor. It was originally named the Olds Expressway, but the Michigan Legislature restored its preferred name and it has been the Old’s Freeway since. It runs along the western edge of the campus of Michigan State University and passes the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame. It also passes the Cooley Gardens area adjacent to the confluence of theGrand and Rededar rivers. Segments of the freeway south of downtown Lansing were built in the location of a historically black neighborhood. This neighborhood was formed based on the segregationist practices of the early 20th century. The main freeway crosses a rail line owned by CSX Transportation and runs parallel to the north side of the rail line while Malcolm X Street follows to the south as far as the Clemens Avenue overpass. After crossing the city line, the freeway turns southward and merges with US  127.