Horse Protection Act of 1970

Soring is the practice of applying irritants or blistering agents to the front feet or forelegs of a horse. It is illegal to show a horse, enter it at a horse show, or to auction, sell, offer for sale, or transport a horse for any of these purposes if it has been sored. Soring began in the 1950s with gaited horse trainers looking to improve their chances of winning at horse shows. In 1969, Senator Joseph Tydings sponsored legislation to prohibit soring, leading to the passing of the Horse Protection Act in 1970.

About Horse Protection Act of 1970 in brief

Summary Horse Protection Act of 1970Soring is the practice of applying irritants or blistering agents to the front feet or forelegs of a horse. It is illegal to show a horse, enter it at a horse show, or to auction, sell, offer for sale, or transport a horse for any of these purposes if it has been sored. Soring began in the 1950s with gaited horse trainers who were looking to improve their chances of winning at horse shows. In 1969, Senator Joseph Tydings sponsored legislation to prohibit soring, leading to the passing of the Horse Protection Act in 1970, amended in 1976. In 2013, an amendment to the act was proposed in the United States House of Representatives. The amendment would allow only USDA employees to perform inspections, toughen penalties for violations, and outlaw the use of action devices and layers of pads attached to the bottom of the front hooves. The requirements of shows and exhibitions are covered in the core provisions of the act, prohibiting the “shipping, delivering, transporting, moving, moving or receiving of any horse which is sore, as well as the actual showing, exhibition, or auction of a sored horse. The export of horses is covered in §18a 1825, with fines of up to 50,000 dollars and up to five years of imprisonment to be sentenced to up to 5 years in prison. The act is found in Title 15 of the U.S. Code, which covers commerce and trade. Section 1821 covers the terms of the terms used in the act and the Congressional statement of the findings placed upon horse covered in §18 1824 covers the core provision of the Act, which is the definition of the term’soring’ Soring is a crime punishable by both civil and criminal penalties, including fines and jail time.

It is an act of animal cruelty that gives practitioners an unfair advantage over other competitors. While Tennessee Walking Horses, Racking Horses and other “high-stepping breeds” are generally targeted by these abusive practices, the Horse protection Act covers all breeds. Although violations of the law are seen most often in the Tennessee Walking Horse industry, the act also covers other breeds such as thoroughbreds, Arabian horses, Quarter Horses, and Arabian horses. There have been a number of unsuccessful challenges to the Act on the grounds on constitutionality, aswell as challenges on varying other issues. The American Horse Protection Association was created in part to address the issue of soring in 1966. In 1966, the American Horse protection Association was founded in part in response to the growing public opposition to the practice. In 1976, a lack of funding led to a 1976 amendment toThe act, which allows non-USDA employees to be trained and certified as inspectors. This program has not always been successful.