Geastrum triplex

The species was first described scientifically, by German botanist Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, as Geaster triplex in 1840. It is the largest member of the genus Geastrum and expanded mature specimens can reach a tip-to-tip length of up to 12 centimeters. The fungus has a history of use in the traditional medicines of native North America and China.

About Geastrum triplex in brief

Summary Geastrum triplexGeastrum triplex is an inedible fungus found in the detritus and leaf litter of hardwood forests around the world. The species was first described scientifically, by German botanist Franz Wilhelm Junghuhn, as Geaster triplex in 1840. It is the largest member of the genus Geastrum and expanded mature specimens can reach a tip-to-tip length of up to 12 centimeters. The fungus has a history of use in the traditional medicines of native North America and China. Fruit bodies have been analyzed chemically to determine their lipid content, and various chemical derivatives of the fungal sterol ergosterol have been identified. The specific epithet triplex refers to the three-layered peristome, which is made of parallel, thin, thread-like filaments. It has acquired several names, including the collared earthstar, the saucered earthstar and the triple earthstar. Like all mushrooms, the fruit body is designed to produce and disseminate spores. Like the mushrooms, it has been found to produce the largest and largest spores of any species of Geastrums. It can be found in Asia, Australasia, Europe, and both North and South America.

The type specimen is kept at the National Herbarium of the Netherlands in Leiden. It was discovered on Mount Panggerangi on the island Java, at an elevation between 3,000 to 5,000 feet. Today, the type specimen of G.  triplex is kept in the National Herbariam of the Dutch Museum of Natural History, Leiden, in the collection of the Royal Academy of Sciences, University of the Arts, and Natural Sciences, London. The fruit body has a small pointed beak, the peristomes, which have a small hole from which spores may be released. The spore sac contains the gleba, a mass of spores and fertile mycelial tissue that when young is white and firm, but ages to become brown and powdery. G. Triplex is further categorized in subsection Laevistomata, which includes species with a fibrilloseperistome—that is, made of Parallel, thin,. thread- like filaments, called mycelium. Within subsection. Laevists Triplex it is in stirps Triplex, due to its delimited or irregular torn and torn peristomome.