Flight Unlimited III

Flight Unlimited III is a 1999 flight simulator video game developed by Looking Glass Studios and published by Electronic Arts. It allows players to pilot simulations of real-world commercial and civilian aircraft in and around Seattle, Washington. The game was one of Looking Glass’s biggest commercial flops, with roughly 20,000 units sold in the United States during 1999. It was well received by critics, who praised its terrain rendering and dynamic weather.

About Flight Unlimited III in brief

Summary Flight Unlimited IIIFlight Unlimited III is a 1999 flight simulator video game developed by Looking Glass Studios and published by Electronic Arts. It allows players to pilot simulations of real-world commercial and civilian aircraft in and around Seattle, Washington. The game was one of Looking Glass’s biggest commercial flops, with roughly 20,000 units sold in the United States during 1999. The main airspace is 10,000 square miles of Seattle terrain; eight other Western American states are modeled as well, albeit in less detail. Players may control ten aircraft: the Lake Turbo Renegade, Stemme S10, Mooney Bravo, Fokker Dr. I, Beechjet 400A, and five planes first included in Flight Unlimited II. Real-time, interactive air traffic control monitors the player’s actions and tries to prevent mid-air collisions. Game’s tutorial mode features 26 lessons, which demonstrate basic and advanced flying techniques and then allow the player to perform them. Challenge missions test the player’s flying ability with objectives such as locating Bigfoot, rescuing a stranded hiker, stopping a theft, or flying through hoops. Before a flight, the player may select which types of weather to encounter. Weather conditions such as cold fronts and thunderstorms develop in real-time.

Players can use the game’s assets to create airports, AI flight paths, and edited landscapes. They may also share their creations online. It was well received by critics, who praised its terrain rendering and dynamic weather. Its simulated physics were lauded by several reviewers, but others felt that the physics were imprecise and that the system requirements were extremely high. The company closed in 2000 after the game failed to capture sufficient market share. It is one of the few flight simulators to feature a realtime, physics-based, weather system, such as those used in Microsoft Flight Simulator 2000 and Fly!, as well as a 3D level editor. It also includes the level editor used to develop the game, which allows you to create airport and AI flightpaths. The flight physics were also based on force calculations, which involve those acting against a plane’s yaw, pitch, and roll, and were coded by Kevin Wasserman and Duncan Hsu, a former car modeler at Papyrus Design Group. In addition to the default “Quick Flight” mode, players can play tutorial and “Challenge” missions, which are available to download from the Internet. The player can fly freely or engage in”Challenge”, such as thwarting a theft or locating Bigfoot.