Famous Fantastic Mysteries

Famous Fantastic Mysteries was an American science fiction and fantasy pulp magazine published from 1939 to 1953. Frequently reprinted authors included George Allan England, A. Merritt, and Austin Hall. The artwork was also a major reason for the success of the magazine, with artists such as Virgil Finlay and Lawrence Stevens contributing some of their best work.

About Famous Fantastic Mysteries in brief

Summary Famous Fantastic MysteriesFamous Fantastic Mysteries was an American science fiction and fantasy pulp magazine published from 1939 to 1953. The first issue was dated SeptemberOctober 1939, and was edited by Mary Gnaedinger. Frequently reprinted authors included George Allan England, A. Merritt, and Austin Hall. The artwork was also a major reason for the success of the magazine, with artists such as Virgil Finlay and Lawrence Stevens contributing some of their best work. In late 1942, Popular Publications acquired the title from Munsey, and Famous Fantastic Mysteries stopped reprinting short stories from the earlier magazines. It continued to reprint longer works, including titles by G. K. Chesterton, H. Wells, and H. Rider Haggard. In 1951, the publishers experimented briefly with a large digest format, but returned quickly to the original pulp layout. The magazine ceased publication in 1953, almost at the end of the pulp era. It was sold to Popular Publications, a major pulp publisher, which helped their titles last a little longer, but Famous Fantastic Mystery finally ceased publication a couple of years before the last of the pulps ceased publication.

The last issue appeared in March 1953, and included Ray Cummings’ “The Girl in the Golden Atom” The first cover for the sixth issue, dated March 1940, was simply tables of contents, but the fifth issue included the serialization of the next issue’s “The Moon Pool Pool” The sixth issue began illustrating for the third time, with the third issue with the cover of “The Conquest of the Moon Pool” Frank R. Paul began illustrating the sixthissue, dated April 1940, and became one of its most popular artists over its lifetime, illustrating all of its six issues. The final issue of Famous Fantastic mysteries was dated March 1950, and featured the cover for “The Sun and the Moon” The lastissue was dated April 1951, and the last issue of Fantastic Novels was dated May 1951. The cover for that issue was simply Tables of Contents, but it also included the first pictorial tables of the first five issues of that month’s “Fantastic Novels” The magazine was sold by Popular Publications to Street & Smith, one of the longest established and most respected publishers, in 1949, and shut down all of their pulp magazines.