California State Route 75

State Route 75 is a 13-mile expressway in San Diego County, California. The state highway is a loop route of Interstate 5 that begins near Imperial Beach, heading west on Palm Avenue. SR 75 passes through the city of Coronado as Orange Avenue and continues onto the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge. In 2013,SR 75 had an annual average daily traffic of 66,000 on the Coronados Bridge.

About California State Route 75 in brief

Summary California State Route 75State Route 75 is a 13-mile expressway in San Diego County, California. The state highway is a loop route of Interstate 5 that begins near Imperial Beach, heading west on Palm Avenue. SR 75 passes through the city of Coronado as Orange Avenue and continues onto the San Diego–Coronado Bay Bridge. The Silver Strand Highway was constructed and open to the public by 1924. What would become SR 75 was added to the state highway system in 1933, and designated Legislative Route 199 in 1935. It was not officially designated until the 1964 state highway renumbering. In 2013,SR 75 had an annual average daily traffic of 66,000 on the Coronados Bridge, and 16,000 between Rainbow Drive and 7th Street in Imperial Beach. It is officially designated as a scenic route for nearly its entire length, meaning that it is a substantial section of highway passing through a “memorable landscape” with no “visual intrusions” It is also part of the National Highway System, a network of highways that are considered essential to the country’s economy, defense, and mobility by the Federal Highway Administration. The intersection of Third Street and Orange Avenue dates back to at least 1890. The process of paving portions of Orange Avenue began in 1893, with an estimated cost of USD 50,000 ; three miles of sidewalks were also included. The plan was to make the avenue “one of the most beautiful in Southern California.

From Palm City to Imperial Beach,. the road was paved by 1920. By 1928, all streets were paved, which was expected to encourage people to visit Tent City. By 1933, the highway was posted as S.S. Route 101 in November 1931. In 1939, a subsequent project passed through Palm City and Cecil City, according to the city’s mayor, William Cecil. The highway passed through Cecil City and the ferry landing in Palm City was completed and open in 1939. By that year, SR 75 was posted from S. S. 101 to the ferry ferry landing. In 2009, SR75 was posted from S Route 101 to the Ferry landing, and in 2010, it was posted S Route 75 from the Ferry Landing to Palm City. In 2011, SR  75 was put on the State Scenic Highway System list, and it was added two years later to the list of state highways. In 2012, the California Scenic Highway System added SR 75 to its list of highway systems, making it eligible for the State Scenic Hwy System. The route continues north along the Silver Strands, a thin strip of land, through Silver Strand State Beach, and through the town of Nestor. It ends at a freeway interchange with I-5 near downtown San Diego, where it joins back with I 5 at a highway interchange. It continues onto the peninsula containing Coronada Island, separated from the mainland by San Diego Bay, before joining back with I-5 again in Logan Heights.