California State Route 57

State Route 57 is a north–south state highway in the Greater Los Angeles Area of California. It connects the interchange of Interstate 5 and SR 22 near downtown Orange. The highway provides a route across several spurs of the Peninsular Ranges. A predecessor to this road ran through Brea Canyon by the early 20th century.

About California State Route 57 in brief

Summary California State Route 57State Route 57 is a north–south state highway in the Greater Los Angeles Area of California. It connects the interchange of Interstate 5 and SR 22 near downtown Orange, locally known as the Orange Crush. The highway provides a route across several spurs of the Peninsular Ranges, linking the Los Angeles Basin with the Pomona Valley and San Gabriel Valley. A predecessor to this road ran through Brea Canyon by the early 20th century and was added to the state highway system. The freeway was built in stages during the 1950s, one of which included the Brea canyon Freeway. SR 57 was designated as part of the 1964 state highway renumbering. The final portion of the present-day Orange Freeway was not completed until the mid 1970s. An unconstructed extension from Santa Ana south to Huntington Beach remains in the legal definition ofSR 57, and has been studied as a toll road above the Santa Ana River. The entire route is in the California Freeway and Expressway System, and is a freeway for its entire constructed length.

In 2013, SR  57 had an annual average daily traffic of 129,500 traffic between SR 60 and Sunset Crossing Road in Diamond Bar and 278,000 traffic between Anaheim and Orangethorpe Avenue in Placentia, the latter of which was the highest for the highway. The road is legally eligible for the State Scenic Highway System, between SR 90 and SR 60, though it has not officially been designated as a scenic highway by the California Department of Transportation. It is also part of the National Highway System, a network of highways that are essential to the country’s economy, defense, and mobility. It was paved in concrete in early 1923, and added to the state system in 1931. This road left the main coast highway left the coast highway and followed the present Brea Boulevard at Fullerton and Breaanyon Road, merging with the main road from Los Angeles to Pomona. In the late 1910s, the road was used as an oiled dirt road, providing a good connection across an outbranch of the Peninsular Ranges.