California State Route 56

State Route 56 is an east–west state highway in the U.S. state of California. It runs 9.5 miles from Interstate 5 in the Carmel Valley neighborhood of San Diego to I-15. The eastern terminus of the highway is also the western end of the Ted Williams Parkway. The route is part of the California Freeway and Expressway System, but not the National Highway System.

About California State Route 56 in brief

Summary California State Route 56State Route 56 is an east–west state highway in the U.S. state of California. It runs 9.5 miles from Interstate 5 in the Carmel Valley neighborhood of San Diego to I-15. The eastern terminus of the highway is also the western end of the Ted Williams Parkway. SR 56 was added to the state highway system in 1959 as Legislative Route 278, and was renumberedSR 56 in the 1964 state highway renumbering. The route is part of the California Freeway and Expressway System, but not the National Highway System, which is considered essential to the country’s economy, defense, and mobility by the Federal Highway Administration. There are no plans to construct the portion of SR 56 east of I-5-15; several arterial roads connect the freeway with SR 67, Twin Peaks Road, Espola Road, and Poway Road. It is the only east-west freeway between SR 78 in north San Diego County, several miles away, and SR 52 near Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. The highway is named after San Diego-born baseball player Ted Williams, who played for the San Diego Padres in the 1930s and ’40s. It was first built in 1959, and the eastern end was completed in 1993. The western end was not completed until 1995 after several lawsuits filed by the Sierra Club and other community groups. The two ends were not connected until the middle portion of the freeway was completed in 2004. The delay was largely due to funding issues and environmental concerns.

In 2014, SR  56 had an annual average daily traffic of 32,000 vehicles between I-10 and I 15, and 81,000 between Carmel Creek Road and Carmel Country Road, the latter of which was the highest AADT for the freeway. The city of Poway included SR 56 in their city plan extending all the way east through the city to a northern extension of SR 125, although Poway wanted the route moved and their city, as of 2014, still wanted the freeway to their city. Since 1990, a public forum was held on April 10, 1990, in Rancho Peñasquitos, in which the public opposed the route because of environmental concerns and funds were not available for constructing the middle of the route. As far back as 1987, the Sierra club opposed the use of sales tax revenue to build the freeway because of the environmental concerns, and so far back in 1990, there were no plans for the route to be built. The routing ran from LRN 2, which later became US 101, all theway east toLRN 198, which are now SR 67. In the 1964 state  highway renumbering, LRN  was designated to run from I 5 to SR 67 and was designated to run from I 10 to I 15 in San Diego. In 1983, both the cities of San Diego and Poway supported the extension of SR  56 all the way east to SR 67, although Poway wanted the route moved and their city wanted the road moved.