Brill Tramway

The Brill Tramway was a six-mile rail line in the Aylesbury Vale, Buckinghamshire, England. It was built in 1871 by the 3rd Duke of Buckingham as a horse tram line to help transport goods. Lobbying from the nearby village of Brill led to its extension to Brill and conversion to passenger use in early 1872. Between 1899 and 1910 other lines were built in the area, providing more direct services to London and the north of England. In 1935 the BrillTramway closed and the infrastructure was dismantled and sold. Little trace remains other than the former junction station at Quainton Road, now the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre.

About Brill Tramway in brief

Summary Brill TramwayThe Brill Tramway was a six-mile rail line in the Aylesbury Vale, Buckinghamshire, England. It was built in 1871 by the 3rd Duke of Buckingham as a horse tram line to help transport goods between his lands around Wotton House and the national rail network. Lobbying from the nearby village of Brill led to its extension to Brill and conversion to passenger use in early 1872. Between 1899 and 1910 other lines were built in the area, providing more direct services to London and the north of England. In 1933 the Metropolitan Railway became the Metropolitan line of London Transport. In 1935 the BrillTramway closed and the infrastructure was dismantled and sold. Little trace remains other than the former junction station at Quainton Road, now the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre. Brill is a small village at the top of the 600-foot high Brill Hill in the Aylesbury Vale in northern Buckinghamshire. It is 12 miles northeast of Oxford, and 45 miles north-west of London. Traditionally believed to have been the home of King Lud, Brill Palace was a seat of the Mercian kings, and an occasional residence of the monarchs of England until at least the reign of Henry III. It was the only population centre in Bernwood Forest, a forest owned by English monarchs as a hunting ground. In the 1861 census it had a population of 1,300. The population of the area remained low, and the primary income source remained the carriage of goods to and from farms.

The only property in the control of the Grenville family was the small ancestral home of W Cotton House and its associated lands near Brill. The family’s estates and their London home at Buckingham House were sold and the family seat of Stowe House seized by bailiffs as security and its contents sold. Richard Plantagenet Campbell Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville was appointed chairman of the London and North Western Railway on 27 May 1857. He became 3rduke of Buckingham and Chandos in 1875 and served as Governor of Madras until 1880. In 1875 he opened the Buckingham House hotel for Sir Harry Verney, 2nd Baronet, to manage the family’s debts incurred by his father, Benjamin Disraeli, Prime Minister of Buckingham. He died in 1881 and was succeeded by his son, the 2nd Duke of. Buckingham. The line was rebuilt in 1910, and more advanced locomotives were introduced, allowing trains to run faster. It became part of London Underground, despite being 40 miles from London and not underground. It closed in 1935 and was replaced by a new line, the Brill Branch, which opened in 1936. The Brill Branch was closed in 1947 and the former station at Quainton Road was converted into a shopping centre. It has been listed as a Grade II listed building in the National Register of Historic Places since 1966.