Boise National Forest

Boise National Forest was created on July 1, 1908, from part of Sawtooth National Forest. It is the largest national forest in the state of Idaho, covering 2,203,703 acres (8,000 square miles) The national forest is one of the most biodiverse national forests in the world, with more than 1,000 species of plants and animals living in it.

About Boise National Forest in brief

Summary Boise National ForestBoise National Forest was created on July 1, 1908, from part of Sawtooth National Forest. The Idaho Batholith underlies most of Boise National Forest, forming the forest’s Boise, Salmon River, and West mountain ranges. The Shoshone people occupied the forest before European settlers arrived in the early 19th century. After the 1860s Boise Basin gold rush ended, mining of tungsten, silver, antimony, and gold continued in the forest until the mid-twentieth century. The forest contains 75 percent of the known populations of Sacajawea’s bitterroot, a flowering plant endemic to Idaho. There are 9,600 miles of streams and rivers and 15,400 acres of lakes and reservoirs. Recreation facilities include over 70 campgrounds, whitewater and flatwater boating, cabin rentals, and 1,300 miles of trails for hiking, biking, horseback riding, and motorized off-road vehicle use. The Forest Service has an objective to maintain timber, range, water, recreation, and wildlife for multiple use and sustained yield of its resources. The most important known placer deposit of niobium and tantalum in the United States is located in Bear Valley, Idaho. From 1953 until 1959, dredges there produced USD 12,000,000 in niobia, tantalum, uranium, and molybdenum, which had been placed under the authority of the U.S. Department of Interior in the 1849 Forest Reserve Act of 1891.

The U. S. Forest Service manages the forest as five units: the Cascade, Emmett, Idaho City, Lowman, and Mountain Home ranger districts. It is the largest national forest in the state of Idaho, covering 2,203,703 acres (8,000 square miles) The forest reaches a maximum elevation of 9,730 feet (2,300 square kilometers) on Steel Mountain. It was originally covered by 1,147,360 acres and originally covered 1,077,000 acres (4,200 square miles), which were transferred to the Forest Service in 1905. It has a population of 6,267, making it the largest National Forest in the Pacific Northwest. The national forest is one of the most biodiverse national forests in the world, with more than 1,000 species of plants and animals living in it. It also contains the largest concentration of sagebrush steppe, spruce-fir forests, and ponderosa pine, and other hardwood forests. The National Forest is home to more than 2,000 endangered species, including the endangered Idaho blue spruce and Idaho yellow spruce. It contains the world’s largest population of red cedars, a species that dates back to at least 10,000 years before the arrival of European settlers in the area in the late 1800s. In the early 1800s, trappers and fur traders of European descent first arrived in Idaho, starting with John Jacob Astor’s Pacific Fur Company in October 1811.