The Long and Winding Road

“The Long and Winding Road” is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1970 album Let It Be. It was written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. When issued as a single in May 1970, a month after the Beatles’ break-up, it became the group’s 20th and last number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States.

About The Long and Winding Road in brief

Summary The Long and Winding Road“The Long and Winding Road” is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1970 album Let It Be. It was written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. When issued as a single in May 1970, a month after the Beatles’ break-up, it became the group’s 20th and last number-one hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States. In 2011, Rolling Stone ranked the song at number 90 on their list of 100 greatest Beatles songs. The song takes the form of a piano-based ballad, with conventional chord changes. Lyrically, it is a sad and melancholic song, with an evocation of an as-yet unrequited, though apparently inevitable, love. Paul McCartney said he came up with the title during one of his first visits to his property High Park Farm, near Campbeltown in Scotland, which he purchased in June 1966. The phrase was inspired by the sight of a road \”stretching up into the hills\” in the remote Highlands surroundings of lochs and distant mountains. In an interview in 1994, McCartney described the lyric more obliquely: “I like writing sad songs, it’s a good bag to get into because you can actually acknowledge some deeper feelings of your own and put them in it. It’s aGood vehicle, it saves having to go to a psychiatrist.’’ The song lacks a traditional chorus, and the melody and lyrics are ambiguous about the opening stanza’s position in the song; it is unclear whether the song has just begun, is in the verse, or is inThe song was recorded in January 1969 and again on 31 January.

The line-up on the track was McCartney on lead vocals and piano, John Lennon on bass guitar, George Harrison on electric guitar, Ringo Starr on drums, and guest keyboardist Billy Preston on Rhodes piano. This was during a series of sessions for an album and film project then known as Get Back. In May 1969, Glyn Johns, who had been asked by the Beatles to compile and mix the Get Back album, selected the 26 January recording of the song as unsuitable for inclusion in the album. In early 1970, Lennon and Allen Klein, Lennon’s manager, turned over the recordings over to the Beatles. This 31 January version, which was recorded with an unofficial producer in an unofficial role, was used in the film, subsequently titled Let it Be. For the 1969 and 1970 versions of Get Back – both of which were rejected – both were used on the 1996 Anthology album Anthology 3. In 1996, the Beatles released a slightly different version of the master version of ‘Long and Winded Road’ which was slightly different from the released version of ‘Let It Be’ and was recorded by the band on 30 January, the following day at the Apple Studio in central London. This version was released on January 3.