Richard Barre

Richard Barre was a medieval English justice, clergyman and scholar. He entered royal service under King Henry II of England, later working for Henry’s son and successor Richard I. Whether Barre is a native of England or of Normandy is unknown, but his surname appears to derive from the Norman village of La Barre, near Bernay, in the present-day department of Eure.

About Richard Barre in brief

Summary Richard BarreRichard Barre was a medieval English justice, clergyman and scholar. He entered royal service under King Henry II of England, later working for Henry’s son and successor Richard I. Barre served the elder Henry as a diplomat and was involved in a minor way with the king’s quarrel with Thomas Becket, which earned Barre a condemnation from Becket. After King Henry’s death, Barre became a royal justice during Richard’s reign and was one of the main judges in the period from 1194 to 1199. He was also archdeacon of Ely and the author of a work of biblical extracts dedicated to one of his patrons, William Longchamp, the Bishop of Ely. Whether Barre is a native of England or of Normandy is unknown, but his surname appears to derive from the Norman village of La Barre, near Bernay, in the present-day department of Eure. He likely born around 1130 and was related to Normandy’s Sifrewast family, knights in Berkshire. Barre had a relative, Hugh Barre,.

who was Archdeacons of Leicester in the 1150s. He was a student at the law school of Bologna in Italy before 1150 and was a. student there with Stephen of Tournai, who became Bishop of Tourai in 1192. The mission attempted to secure the rescinding of the excommunication of those whom Becket had placed under clerical ban, but it was unsuccessful. During January and February 1170 the king sent Barre on a diplomatic mission to the pope in Rome, on a matter related to the king’s dispute withBecket. When Becket protested to Pope Alexander III over this usurpation of the crown English kings, Alexander not only stated that no such permission had been granted, but there is no written evidence that Barre agreed to allow the coronation in 1170. The mission’s objective was to make it clear to Becket that Henry had nothing to do with his murder and that the king was horrified it had taken place at all.