Guilden Morden boar

The Guilden Morden boar is a sixth- or seventh-century Anglo-Saxon copper alloy figure of a boar that may have once served as the crest of a helmet. It was found around 1864 or 1865 in a grave in a village in the eastern English county of Cambridgeshire. Boar-crested helmets are a staple of Anglo- Saxon imagery, evidence of a Germanic tradition in which the boar invoked the protection of deities.

About Guilden Morden boar in brief

Summary Guilden Morden boarThe Guilden Morden boar is a sixth- or seventh-century Anglo-Saxon copper alloy figure of a boar that may have once served as the crest of a helmet. It was found around 1864 or 1865 in a grave in a village in the eastern English county of Cambridgeshire. Boar-crested helmets are a staple of Anglo- Saxon imagery, evidence of a Germanic tradition in which the boar invoked the protection of deities. The boar was donated to the British Museum in 1904 by Herbert George Fordham, whose father originally discovered it. As of 2018 it was on view in room 41 of the museum’s gallery of ship-burial finds from 300 to 1100 AD, and includes the Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre and the Lycus Cup. It has also been shown at the Diömuseum in Paderborn, Germany, as part of CRED: Christianisierungen im Mittelalter. The Guilden Morden boar is marked by the Germanic word “morden” which means “boar” or “mane” and means the same thing as “breath” or ‘breath’ in German.

The tail once formed a full circle but was broken around 1904. The front two and back two legs were each cast as one piece, yet where a 3. 5 mm deep socket was hollowed into the front piece, a 6 mm long pin extends down from the back piece. A pin and socket design formed by the front and hind legs suggests that the Boar was mounted on another object, such as a helmet, such is the case on one of the contemporary Torslunda plates found in Sweden. It is one of three boar-adorned helmets known to have survived to the present, and it has been exhibited both domestically and internationally. From April to October 2004 it was displayed at the Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre in Suffolk, and again from 26 July to 16 October 2013, this time at the Diöm museum.