Jadwiga of Poland

Jadwiga was the third and youngest daughter of Louis I, King of Hungary and Poland, and his second wife, Elizabeth of Bosnia. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, but had more close forebears among the Polish Piasts. In 1375 it was planned that she would eventually marry William of Austria, and would live in Vienna from 1378 to 1380. Jogaila, now in Polish styled Władysław Jagiełło, was crowned King of Poland on 4 March 1386.

About Jadwiga of Poland in brief

Summary Jadwiga of PolandJadwiga was the third and youngest daughter of Louis I, King of Hungary and Poland, and his second wife, Elizabeth of Bosnia. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, but had more close forebears among the Polish Piasts. In 1997 she was canonized by the Catholic Church. In 1375 it was planned that she would eventually marry William of Austria, and would live in Vienna from 1378 to 1380. Her coronation either reflected the Polish nobility’s opposition to her intended husband, William, becoming king without further negotiation, or simply emphasized her status as queen regnant. Jogaila, now in Polish styled Władysław Jagiełło, was crowned King of Poland on 4 March 1386. She mediated between her husband’s quarreling kin, and between Poland and the Teutonic Knights. After her sister Mary died in 1395, she laid claim to Hungary against the widowed Sigismund of Luxemburg, but the Hungarian lords failed to support them. She died on 17 July 1399, and was succeeded by her son, Leopold III, Duke of Austria. She is buried in Vienna, where she was married to William, her father’s eldest son, from 1375 to 1386, and is buried alongside her mother and sister, Elizabeth, in St. Peter’s Square, Vienna. She had a daughter, Mary, who was crowned king of Hungary in 1382, but later died of illness in 1394. She also had a son, William of Hungary, who became King of Austria in 1380, and later died in battle in 1385.

Her daughter, Catherine, was later crowned queen of Poland in 1384, but died in childbirth in 1396. Jad wiga was named after her distant ancestor, Saint Hedwig of Silesia, especially especially in the royal court at the time of her birth. Her father wanted to ensure his daughters’ right to inherit his throne, especially since he had not fathered any sons. The Polish nobles acknowledged that one of Louis’s daughters would succeed him after he died, and extended their liberties in the Privilege of Koszyce on 17 September 1374. The envoys of the Polish nobles also took an oath to demand loyalty to Louis’s eldest daughter Catherine, especially on 18 August 1374, especially after he acknowledged that he had fathered three daughters as attractive brides. She married William, the eldest son of William, in 1375, and lived in Vienna until 1378, when she moved to Kraków to be with him in Poland. She then marched into the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, which had been under Hungarian rule, and persuaded most of the inhabitants to become subjects to the Polish Crown. She later became co-ruler of Poland with her husband, and ruled there until her death in 1399. Her son William was later elected king of Poland, but he was expelled from the throne by the nobles.