Bramall Hall

Bramall Hall is a largely Tudor manor house in Bramhall, within the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. Dating back to Anglo-Saxon England, the manor of Bramall was first described in the Domesday Book in 1086. From the late 14th century it was owned by the Davenports who built the present house. The name Bramall means ‘nook of land where broom grows’ and is derived from the Old English noun brōm meaning broom.

About Bramall Hall in brief

Summary Bramall HallBramall Hall is a largely Tudor manor house in Bramhall, within the Metropolitan Borough of Stockport, Greater Manchester, England. Dating back to Anglo-Saxon England, the manor of Bramall was first described in the Domesday Book in 1086, when it was held by the Masseys. From the late 14th century it was owned by the Davenports who built the present house. The house, which functions as a museum, and its 70 acres of landscaped parkland with lakes, woodland, and gardens are open to the public. The name Bramall means ‘nook of land where broom grows’ and is derived from the Old English noun brōm meaning broom, a type of shrub common in the area. The Davenport family were a significant landowners in the north-west of England whose antecedents can be traced back to the time of the Norman conquest. It is possible that Bramall may have been vandalised by a man named Randle Hassle, who stole nine or nine houses and destroyed all part of the Bosworth Estate during the final battle of the Wars of the Roses at Bosworth. The Hall and a residual park of over 50 acres was sold on by the Freeholders to the Nevill family of successful industrialists. In 1925 it was purchased by John Henry Davies, and then, in 1935, acquired by the local government authority for the area, Hazel Grove and Bramhall Urban District Council.

Following local government reorganisation in 1974, Bramall Hall was bought by Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council, which describes it as ‘the most prestigious and historically significant building in the Conservation Area’ The name ‘Bramal’ means ‘nook’ in Old English and ‘halh’ is ‘secret place’ or ‘valley’, which could refer to Bramall. The manor was devastated during William the Conqueror’s Harrying of the North and was given to Hamon de Massey in around 1070. It was part of Hamestan Hundred in Cheshire, with Cheadle and Norbury, which today lie within the modern-day Metropolitan Borough, in the early 13th century. In 1160, the family became responsible for Macclesfield Forest, and Vivian Daven Port became its Grand Sergeant. The first William Daven port was recorded as one of the trustees of the first Grammar School. The family’s coat of arms includes a man’s head with a rope around the neck, which is said to represent the family’s power over life and death during this period. It is likely that they built the current house after their accession to Bramhall in 1478 to 1528. The current house was built at Henford, Henford and lastly at Bramhall through marriage at the end of the 15th century, and it is believed that it was built in the 16th Century.