1st Provisional Marine Brigade

The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade was a Marine infantry brigade of the United States Marine Corps. The brigade saw five brief activations for service over a 40-year span. In its first iteration in 1912, the brigade had only 1,200 men in two provisional regiments. When re-formed for duty in Iceland in 1941, it was based around volunteers from the 2nd Marine Division. In 1950 the brigade acted as an advance force for the newly reactivated 1st Marine Division before merging into that unit.

About 1st Provisional Marine Brigade in brief

Summary 1st Provisional Marine BrigadeThe 1st Provisional Marine Brigade was a Marine infantry brigade of the United States Marine Corps. It was an ad hoc unit formed for specific operations and not considered a “permanent” USMC unit. The brigade saw five brief activations for service over a 40-year span. In its first iteration in 1912, the brigade had only 1,200 men in two provisional regiments. When re-formed for duty in Iceland in 1941, it was based around volunteers from the 2nd Marine Division. During World War II two other provisional Marine brigades were formed, which eventually expanded into divisions. In 1950 the brigade acted as an advance force for the newly reactivated 1st Marine Division before merging into that unit. The brigade was deactivated for the last time when it was merged with the 1st Marines Division. The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade was first created in 1912 for occupation duties in Cuba. It fanned out in Oriente occupying 26 towns and controlling all rail traffic in the area. At the same time, on 22 May, on the coast of Florida, a 2nd Provisional Regiment of 750 men under Colonel James Mahoney sailed for Cuba. The Marines protected the U.S. sugar plantations in Siboney and El Cobre until late July when the Cuban government was able to clamp down on the revolt. There they combined to form the 1st provisional Marine Brigade, which served until early June of that year.

In early June early June, the Marines fanned out in early June to Guantanamo Bay, where they combined with the remainder of the force at Guantanamo to stop the flow of illegal immigrants into Cuba. At that time, a 1st Marine Regiment under Colonel Lincoln Karmany was assembled at Key West, Florida, with two regiments aboard the USS Prairie, with 1st Battalion, 2nd Battalion, and 2nd Battalion at Guantanamo. In June 1912, a 2nd Marine Regiment, with 750 men, sailed to Cuba to protect the sugar plantations until late June when the government clamped down on that point. In July, the United Suffolk and Cuba fanned out to control the Oriente  Province, occupying 26  towns and all rail traffic in the area, controlling all rail and sugar traps until late July. In August 1912, they fanned out in Oriente, occupying the Oriente Province, controlling all rail and sugar trailer traffic in that area until late August. In September 1912, the United States Marines occupied Siboney and El Cobre  Province. In October 1912, the U.S Marines occupied Copenhagen, and in September 1913, they occupied Oral Papua Pair, in the Philippines. In December 1913, the U S. Marines occupied the Orient Para, in what is now the Philippines, and held the island until the end of World War I. In April 1914, the 2st Marine Regiment was assembled in Cuba to defend against the Spanish.