Terrorism

Terrorism is, in the broadest sense, the use of intentional violence for political or religious purposes. It is used in this regard primarily to refer to violence during peacetime or in the context of war against non-combatants. The term originated during the French Revolution of the late 18th century but gained mainstream popularity in the 1970s during the conflicts of Northern Ireland, the Basque Country and Palestine.

About Terrorism in brief

Summary TerrorismTerrorism is, in the broadest sense, the use of intentional violence for political or religious purposes. It is used in this regard primarily to refer to violence during peacetime or in the context of war against non-combatants. The term originated during the French Revolution of the late 18th century but gained mainstream popularity in the 1970s during the conflicts of Northern Ireland, the Basque Country and Palestine. The increased use of suicide attacks from the 1980s onwards was typified by the September 11 attacks in New York City and Washington, D. C. in 2001. There are various different definitions of terrorism, with no universal agreement about it. When terrorism is perpetrated by nation states, it is not considered terrorism by the state conducting it, making legality a largely grey-area issue. There is no consensus as to whether or not terrorism should be regarded as a war crime. The Global Terrorism Database, maintained by the University of Maryland, College Park, has recorded more than 61,000 incidents of non-state terrorism, resulting in at least 140,000 deaths, between 2000 and 2014. Most scholars today trace the origins of the modern tactic of terrorism to the Jewish Sicarii Zealots who attacked Romans and Jews in 1st-century Palestine. They follow its development from the Persian Order of Assassins through to 19th-century anarchists. The word terror is derived from the Latin verb Tersere, which later becomes Terrere.

The latter form appears in European languages as early as the 12th century; its first known use in French is the word terrible in 1160. In December 1795, Edmund Burke used the word ‘Terrorists’ in a description of the new French government called’directory’ The term terrorism has generally been used to describe violence by non- state actors rather than government violence since the 19th century Anarchist Movement. The terms ‘terrorist’ and ‘terrorism’ are loose currency in the UK and the U.S. and gained renewed renewed popularity after the 1983 Beirut barracks bombings and the Bali bombings in 2002. A number of books on terrorism were published in 1970s, and the topic came to the fore after the Beirut bombings and again after September 11, 2001. The first use of the term ‘terror’ was in a 1970 issue of Life magazine, which was described as a terrorist in a issue of Leila Khaled Khaled, the Red Army Leila, Leila Leila and Leila’s Red Army Red Army Faction. In the same issue, Life magazine described the French government as ‘the Satellites of Tyranny, who had shut up the people on the last Revolution, and are let loose on the people…. To secure them further they have a strong corps of irregulars, ready, ready armed, on the Prisoners of Terror, whom they have called ‘Hell-hounds of Terror’.. Thousands of those Hell-Hounds are called Terrorists, who are let go on the prisoners.