Pseudoryzomys

Pseudoryzomys simplex, also known as the Brazilian false rice rat or false oryzomys, is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae from south-central South America. It is a medium-sized species, weighing about 50 grams, with gray–brown fur, long and narrow hindfeet, and a tail that is about as long as the head and body. It lives in the rainforests of the southern tip of the Andes and the Amazon River basin.

About Pseudoryzomys in brief

Summary PseudoryzomysPseudoryzomys simplex, also known as the Brazilian false rice rat or false oryzomys, is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae from south-central South America. It is a medium-sized species, weighing about 50 grams, with gray–brown fur, long and narrow hindfeet, and a tail that is about as long as the head and body. The IUCN has assessed its conservation status as being of least concern, although almost nothing is known about its diet or reproduction. It was first described in 1888 by Danish zoologist Herluf Winge, who reviewed the materials Peter Wilhem Lund had collected in the caves of Lagoa Santa, Minas Gerais, Brazil. In 1921, British mammalogist Oldfield Thomas described Oryzomy wavrini as a new species of OryZomys from Paraguay. In 1980, Argentine zoologist Eloia Massoia suggested that the same species are in fact the same. In 1991, American zoologists Voss and Myers re-examined the relationships of Pseudory zomys and Ory Zomys. Since then, the species has been known as PseudaryzomYS simplex because simplex is the oldest specific name for the animal. The species is the only species in the genus Pseudorzy, and its closest living relatives are the large rats Holochilus and Lundomys which are semiaquatic, spending much of their time in the water. Together, they form a unique assemblage within the oryzomyine tribe, a very diverse group including over one hundred species, mainly in South America, which includes many more species from Eurasia and the Americas.

The Bolivian population was named as a separate subspecies in 1975. It has been described as a subspecies of the species Pseudorsus wavRini reigi, because Bolivians are slightly larger and darker than the Paraguay-based animals, and it is found in lowland palm savanna and thorn scrub habitats. It can be found in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and Argentina. It lives in the rainforests of the southern tip of the Andes and the Amazon River basin. It feeds on insects and other small invertebrates, such as ants, mosquitoes, and termites. Its diet is believed to be mainly water-based, but it has also been known to eat insects, frogs, and other arthropod carcasses. The only known food source for this species is insects. It also has a large diet of insects, including insects, seeds, and seeds. It may have a preference for eating insects that have been cooked by other species of rat. It’s the only member of its genus in which the molar crowns are at an advanced stage of development. The skull of the animal is not complex enough to be used as an identification tool.