Ordinances of 1311

The Ordinances of 1311 were a series of regulations imposed upon King Edward II by the peerage and clergy of the Kingdom of England to restrict the power of the king. English setbacks in the Scottish war, combined with perceived extortionate royal fiscal policies, set the background for the writing of the Ordinances. Edward II accepted the Ord ordinances only under coercion, and a long struggle for their repeal ensued.

About Ordinances of 1311 in brief

Summary Ordinances of 1311The Ordinances of 1311 were a series of regulations imposed upon King Edward II by the peerage and clergy of the Kingdom of England to restrict the power of the king. English setbacks in the Scottish war, combined with perceived extortionate royal fiscal policies, set the background for the writing of the Ordinances. Just as instrumental to their conception were other issues, particularly discontent with the king’s favourite, Piers Gaveston, whom the barons subsequently banished from the realm. Edward II accepted the Ord ordinances only under coercion, and a long struggle for their repeal ensued that did not end until Earl Thomas of Lancaster, the leader of theOrdainers, was executed in 1322. The Ordinances reflect the Provisions of Oxford and the Provision of Westminster from the late 1250s, but unlike the. Provisions, the Ordinance featured a new concern with fiscal reform, specifically redirecting revenues from the. king’s household to the exchequer. The king immediately started plotting for his favourite’s return. At the parliament of April 1309, he suggested a compromise in which certain certain earls would be met in exchange for his return. The plan came to nothing, but Edward had strengthened the Stamford parliament in July that year by receiving a papal annulment of the so-called ‘Statute of Stamford’ The king agreed to the compromise, and GAveston was allowed to return to the country in February 1311. Yet upon his return, he was more arrogant than ever, conferring nicknames on some earls and insulting nicknames of the greater nobles on some other occasions.

In the following year he was not ordered to attend a great council of the earls, and was not allowed to attend the Parliament of February 1313. The next year, he left the country on appointment as Lieutenant of Ireland. He died in March 1314, leaving his son Edward II as king of England without a son or heir to the throne. Edward I had spent the last decade of his reign relentlessly campaigning against the Scots, his son abandoned the war almost entirely. In this situation, the Scottish king Robert Bruce soon took the opportunity to regain what had been lost. Among the honours Edward heaped upon Gavestone was the earldom of Cornwall, a title which had previously only been conferred on members of the royal family. The preferential treatment of an upstart, in combination with his behaviour that was seen as arrogant, led to resentment among the established peers of the realm and the king had developed a particularly close relationship with the Gascon of relatively humble origins. In April 1308, it was decided that Gav Charleston should be banned from the realms upon threat of excommunication. On 24 June, GAVeston left thecountry on appointment of  Lieutenant of Irish. In October, several months later, several earls refused to meet to meet the king, and several of the great council in October, he refused to attend due to his presence.