Michael Brown Okinawa assault incident

U.S. Marine Corps Major Michael Brown attempted an indecent assault on a Filipina bartender in Okinawa, Japan. The bartender accused Brown of attempting to rape her and of throwing her cell phone into a nearby river; Brown denied the rape charges. On July 8, 2004, after a 19-month trial, Brown was convicted by a Japanese court of attempted indecent assault and destruction of private property and received a one-year suspended prison sentence. He was demoted and involuntarily retired from the military in 2006 and at his trial in 2009 entered an Alford plea, receiving probation on the felony conviction.

About Michael Brown Okinawa assault incident in brief

Summary Michael Brown Okinawa assault incidentU.S. Marine Corps Major Michael Brown attempted an indecent assault on a Filipina bartender in Okinawa, Japan. The bartender accused Brown of attempting to rape her and of throwing her cell phone into a nearby river; Brown denied the rape charges. The victim later recanted and attempted to withdraw the accusation, though prosecutors presented evidence that she had received a cash payment just before doing so. On July 8, 2004, after a 19-month trial, Brown was convicted by a Japanese court of attempted indecent assault and destruction of private property and received a one-year suspended prison sentence. He was demoted and involuntarily retired from the military in 2006 and at his trial in 2009 entered an Alford plea, receiving probation on the felony conviction. The crime sparked a public debate over the U. S. military presence in Japan, the privileges of extraterritoriality, as well as the fair-trial practices of Japanese legal system and the Japanese police. The case involved the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security Between the United States and Japan and the US –Japan Status of Forces Agreement. As a result of this incident, both countries entered into negotiations aimed at modifying the SOFA in July 2003; ultimately, no changes were made to the agreement. The United States, however, decided not to turn over Brown to the Japanese authorities before he was formally indicted. The next day, Brown, escorted by U. s. military police, was turned over to the custody of Japanese police at the Naha Naha detention center at Naha, Okinawa.

The U.S.-Japan SOFA agreement stated that service members would only be turned over. to Japanese law enforcement if formally indicted, the U.-S. had agreed to give “sympathetic consideration” to the crimes in response to the 1995 Okinawan rape incident, in which a U.s. Navy sailor raped a 12-year-old Okinawan girl. The incident occurred on November 2, 2002, at 1:30 a.m. local time. A female employee of the Camp Courtney officers’ club on Okinawa drove up to the Courtney main gate and reported to base security personnel that a Marine Corps major had just attempted to sexually assault her in her car on a deserted road near the back gate of the base. The woman, later identified with the initials V. N., who was 40 years old, and originally from the Philippines, had lived in Okinawa for 17 years, and was married to a Japanese citizen of Okinawan descent. She said she had picked up Brown in herCar about 1: 30 a. m. after the officers’ Club closed and that he directed her to the deserted road behind the base and after parking, Brown tried to raped her and then threw her mobile phone into the river when she tried to call the police. On December 3, 2002,. the JNP issued a warrant for Brown’s arrest. The Japanese government asked that Brown be turn over to Japanese authorities immediately. Brown voluntarily underwent several hours of questioning at the J NP station in Gushikawa.