Gorgosaurus

Gorgosaurus is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur. It lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period. The type species is G. libratus; the specific epithet is the past participle of the Latin verb librare, meaning “to balance”

About Gorgosaurus in brief

Summary GorgosaurusGorgosaurus is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived in western North America during the Late Cretaceous Period. Gorgosaurus lived in a lush floodplain environment along the edge of an inland sea. It was an apex predator, preying upon abundant ceratopsids and hadrosaurs. The type species is G. libratus; the specific epithet is the past participle of the Latin verb librare, meaning “to balance” It is thought to have lived between 76. 6 and 75. 1 million years ago. Fossil remains have been found in the Canadian province of Alberta and possibly the U.S. state of Montana. Some experts consider it to be a species of Albertosaurus, making it a junior synonym of that genus. It is the best-represented tyrannosaurus in the fossil record, known from a virtually complete growth series. The holotype is a nearly complete skeleton associated with a skull, discovered in 1913 by Charles M. Sternberg. Dozens of other specimens have been excavated from the Dinosaur Park Formation and are housed in museums across the United States and Canada. It remains uncertain whether they belong to Gorgosaurs or a new species of Gibratus or a horridus lorridus. Several skeletons from the Medicine River Formation of Montana are also believed to belong to the Gorgosaurus lOrridus, although it remains uncertain if they are part of the same species or a different genus.

The fossil remains have allowed scientists to investigate its ontogeny, life history and other aspects of its biology. The name is derived from the Greek  gorgos and σαυρήsaurus, which means “balanced” or “to have a good balance” and refers to its large, sharp teeth. In 1856, Joseph Leidy described two tyrannososaurusid premaxillary teeth from Montana. Although there was no indication of what the animal looked like, the teeth were large and robust, and Leidy gave them the name Deinodon. Today’s paleontologists regard this specimen as a juvenile G. lbratus. Although Deinodons are very similar to those of Gorgosaurus, it cannot be said for certain which animal they belonged to, so it is usually regarded as a nomenomenal nomenalium today. The specimen from Montana is housed in the Children’s Museum of Montana’s Children’s Natural History and is called Laps hazenianus incaelrculus, or Lapshaenian Lapsrculus incapsianus, incapsalculus, Lapshiaenus incapsilis, Lpshiae incapsis, and Dryptosaurus kenabekides. It has been suggested that it may have been a member of the genus Gorgsosaurus, but this has not been confirmed by paleontologist.