Fir Clump Stone Circle

Fir Clump Stone Circle was a stone circle in Burderop Wood near Wroughton, Wiltshire, in South West England. It was part of a tradition of stone circle construction that spread throughout much of Britain, Ireland, and Brittany during the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The purpose of such monuments is unknown, although some archaeologists speculate that the stones represented supernatural entities for the circle’s builders.

About Fir Clump Stone Circle in brief

Summary Fir Clump Stone CircleFir Clump Stone Circle was a stone circle in Burderop Wood near Wroughton, Wiltshire, in South West England. It was part of a tradition of stone circle construction that spread throughout much of Britain, Ireland, and Brittany during the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. The purpose of such monuments is unknown, although some archaeologists speculate that the stones represented supernatural entities for the circle’s builders. In 1969, these stones were removed during construction of the M4 motorway. Around the 1860s, the megaliths in Fir ClumpStone Circle were levelled and in the 1890s the antiquarian A.

D. Passmore observed that the circle was no longer visible. Some of the fallen megalith were rediscovered in 1965 by the archaeologist Richard Reiss, who described and measured the monument. The outer ring measured 107 metres by 86. 5 metres in diameter; the inner ring was 86.5 metres by 73. 7 metres. It was one of at least seven stone circles that are known to have been erected in the area south of Swindon. All of the other examples are ruined, and in some cases have been destroyed. The stones at the Day House Lane Stone Circle in Coate remain, albeit in a fallen state.