Brill railway station

Brill railway station was the terminus of a small railway line in Buckinghamshire, England. Built and owned by the 3rd Duke of Buckingham, it was later operated by London’s Metropolitan Railway. In 1933 the Metropolitan Railway was taken into public ownership and became the Metropolitan line of London Transport. The line was closed on 30 November 1935, and all buildings and infrastructure at Brill associated with the line were sold at auction.

About Brill railway station in brief

Summary Brill railway stationBrill railway station was the terminus of a small railway line in Buckinghamshire, England, known as the Brill Tramway. Built and owned by the 3rd Duke of Buckingham, it was later operated by London’s Metropolitan Railway, and in 1933 briefly became one of the two north-western termini of the London Underground. The station was a significant point for freight traffic, particularly as a carrier of milk from the dairy farms of Buckinghamshire to Aylesbury and London. In 1933 the Metropolitan Railway was taken into public ownership and became the Metropolitan line of London Transport. The line was closed on 30 November 1935, and all buildings and infrastructure at Brill associated with the line were sold at auction. Most of the infrastructure was subsequently demolished, though three station cottages survive. At its opening in 1872, the station was small, with a single platform, which served as the freight depot, passenger terminal, and a pen for cattle.

A third cottage was built across the road from the station in 1871, and there was one building, which was used as a ticket office for staff, next to a siding that led to a cattle pen. When the line opened, Brill was a small town of 1,400 people when the line was opened, owing to the hilltop setting of the town. It was 45 miles and over two hours’ travelling time from the City of London, despite being 45 miles away from the main London to Oxford line. The Duke bought two Aveling and Porter locomotives built to a modified traction engine design, each with a top speed of 8 miles per hour, although a speed limit of 5 miles perhour was enforced. In 1894, the trustees of the Duke’s estate set up the Oxford &Aylesbury Tramroad Company with the intention of extending the line to Oxford, but the extension beyond Brill was never built. During the 1890s, plans were made to extend the tramway to Oxford but the scheme was abandoned.