Associated Press

The Associated Press was formed in May 1846 by five daily newspapers in New York City to share the cost of transmitting news of the Mexican–American War. By 2016, news collected by the AP was published and republished by more than 1,300 newspapers and broadcasters. The AP has earned 54 Pulitzer Prizes, including 32 for photography, since the award was established in 1917.

About Associated Press in brief

Summary Associated PressThe Associated Press was formed in May 1846 by five daily newspapers in New York City to share the cost of transmitting news of the Mexican–American War. By 2016, news collected by the AP was published and republished by more than 1,300 newspapers and broadcasters. The AP operates 248 news bureaus in 99 countries. It also operates the AP Radio Network, which provides newscasts twice hourly for broadcast and satellite radio and television stations. In 1994, it established APTV, a global newsgathering agency that provides video to international broadcasters and websites. In 2004, AP moved its headquarters from its longtime home at Rockefeller Plaza to a huge building at 50 Rockefeller Plaza in Manhattan. The agency has been tracking vote counts in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures. It collects and verifies returns in every county, parish, city and town across the U. S., and declares winners in over 5,000 contests. In 1945, the Court of the United States held in Associated Press v. Sherman that the AP had been violating the Antitrust Act by prohibiting member newspapers from selling or providing news to non-member organizations. The decision facilitated the main rival United Press International, headed by Hugh Baillie, from 1935 to 1955. In 1974, AP entered the broadcast field in 1941 when it began distributing news to radio stations; it created its own radio network in 1974. In 1998, AP merged with WorldWide News Television in 1998 to form APTN, which provided video tointernational broadcasters and Websites.

In 2007, AP President Tom Curley called the practice of editing a story to fit its available publication area without losing the story’s essentials, although in 2007, then-AP President TomCurley called it “dead.” The AP has earned 54 Pulitzer Prizes, including 32 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. The cooperative grew rapidly under the leadership of Kent Cooper, who built up bureau staff in South America, Europe and, the Middle East. In 1935, AP launched the Wirephoto network, which allowed transmission of news photographs over leased private telephone lines on the day they were taken. This gave AP a major advantage over other news media outlets. While the first network was only between New York, Chicago, and San Francisco, eventually AP had its network across the whole United States. The New York Times became a member shortly after its founding in September 1851. The organization faced competition from the Western Associated Press, which criticized its monopolistic news gathering and price setting practices. A 1900 Illinois Supreme Court decision resulted in AP’s move from Chicago to New York city, where corporation laws were more favorable to cooperatives. The New-York Tribune joined at this time; documents show it was a member in 1849. The invention of the rotary press allowed the New- York Tribune in the 1870s to print 18,000 papers per hour.