Prospect Hill Plantation

Prospect Hill Plantation was a 5,000-acre plantation in Jefferson County, Mississippi. In the early 19th century, it was owned by Isaac Ross of South Carolina, who enslaved Black people to farm cotton as a cash crop. In 1830, Ross and other major planters co-founded the Mississippi chapter of the American Colonization Society.

About Prospect Hill Plantation in brief

Summary Prospect Hill PlantationProspect Hill Plantation was a 5,000-acre plantation in Jefferson County, Mississippi. In the early 19th century, it was owned by Isaac Ross of South Carolina, who enslaved Black people to farm cotton as a cash crop. In 1830, Ross and other major planters co-founded the Mississippi chapter of the American Colonization Society, which sought to move enslaved people to Mississippi-in-Africa. In 1836, Ross died. His will freed those enslaved people who agreed to move, and provided for sale of his plantation to fund their move. The plantation was finally sold, and about 300 enslaved people were freed and transported by 1848.

They and their descendants were among the Americo-Liberian elite that held power into the late 20th century. In 2011 the plantation and house were acquired by the Archeological Conservancy for preservation of the total property. It is expected to yield artifacts that will contribute to the story of slavery in the United States, as well as to African-American culture and the diaspora. The mansion is still standing, although it has deteriorated in its decades of vacancy.