Kinzua Bridge

The Kinzua Bridge was built in 1882 and was billed as the tallest railroad bridge in the world. In 1900, the bridge was dismantled and rebuilt out of steel to accommodate heavier trains. Most of the bridge collapsed during a tornado in July 2003. It is now located in McKean County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.

About Kinzua Bridge in brief

Summary Kinzua BridgeThe Kinzua Bridge was built in 1882 and was billed as the tallest railroad bridge in the world. In 1900, the bridge was dismantled and rebuilt out of steel to accommodate heavier trains. Most of the bridge collapsed during a tornado in July 2003. The bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977 and as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers in 1982. The ruins of the KinZua Bridge are in KinzUA Bridge State Park off U.S. Route 6 near the borough of Mount Jewett, Pennsylvania. The last traffic crossed the bridge on May 14, 1900, and removal of the old iron bridge began on May 24, 1900. The new bridge was designed by C. R. Grimm and was built by the Elmira Elmira Bridge Company out of 3,358 short tons of steel, at a cost of USD 275,000. It stayed in commercial service until 1959 and was sold to the Government of Pennsylvania in 1963, becoming the centerpiece of a state park. People sometimes visited the bridge in hopes of finding the loot of a bank robber, who supposedly hid USD 40,000 in gold and currency under or near it. It held the height record until the Garabit viaduct, 401 feet tall, was completed in France in 1884. It was listed as the fourth-tallest railway bridge in the United States. Before its collapse, the Kinz Hua Bridge was ranked as the fifth tallest railway bridge in America.

It is now located in McKean County in the U. S. state of Pennsylvania, near the town of MountJewett, and is part of the Pennsylvania State Parks system. It has been listed as one of the top 10 historic bridges in the country since the 1970s, and has been visited by more than 100,000 people since the 1980s. It remains the tallest bridge in Pennsylvania, with a total length of 2,052 feet (301 feet) and a width of 193 feet (193 feet) The bridge’s 110 sandstone masonry piers were quarried from the hillside used for the foundation of theBridge was designed to support a load of 266 short tons. The tallest tower had a base that was 193 feet wide. On completion, thebridge was the tallest and longest railroad bridge and was advertised as the “Eighth Wonder of the World”. Six of the Bridge’s 20 towers were taller than the Brooklyn Bridge. It had a maximum speed of 5 miles per hour because the locomotive, and sometimes the wind, caused the bridge to vibrate. It remained in commercial service until 1959, when the owner of the New York, Lake Erie and Western Railway merged with the Erie Railroad. By the start of the 20th century, locomives were almost 85 percent safely carrying heavier, and the bridge could no longer safely carry trains. The old bridge was torn down and replaced with a new steel bridge that was almost four months to complete.