Fantasy Book

Fantasy Book is a defunct semi-professional American science fiction magazine. It published eight issues between 1947 and 1951. Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, A. E. van Vogt, Robert Bloch, and L. Ron Hubbard were among the writers who submitted stories for the magazine.

About Fantasy Book in brief

Summary Fantasy BookFantasy Book is a defunct semi-professional American science fiction magazine. It published eight issues between 1947 and 1951. The editor was William Crawford, and the publisher was Crawford’s Fantasy Publishing Company, Inc. The best-known story to appear in the magazine was Cordwainer Smith’s first sale, “Scanners Live in Vain”, which was later included in the first Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthology, and is now regarded as one of Smith’s finest works. The eighth and final issue appeared in January 1951. A serial, The Machine-God Laughs, began in the seventh issue and was incomplete when the magazine ceased publication in 1952. It subsequently appeared in Startling Stories, which was serialized over three issues in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

The last issue of Startling stories was published in the spring of 1961. It featured the first installment of a serial, Black Goldfish, by John Taine, which ran for two issues. The final issue of the magazine appeared in the summer of 1961, and it was the last to be published in print. The magazine was never widely distributed; Crawford had problems distributing the magazine, and his budget limited the quality of the paper he could afford and the artwork he was able to buy. Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, A. E. van Vogt, Robert Bloch, and L. Ron Hubbard were among the writers who submitted stories for the magazine. The first science fiction magazine, Amazing Stories, appeared in 1926, and by the mid-1930s SF pulp magazines were a well-established genre.